Comments about ‘Every knee shall bow? Many atheist scientists take their kids to church’

Return to article »

Published: Wednesday, Dec. 7 2011 3:28 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
El caballero
Tremonton, UT

I don't know why it is so surprising. I am LDS and I love periodically visiting other churches and seeing how they worship as well. I also noticed the obvious omission: no mention on what percent of those baptized in a faith don't attend church at all in a year. Bet it's higher than 17%.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

HA! If religion is so obviously dumb then why waste your kids time taking them to church?

Pagan
Salt Lake City, UT

'The chill of the season is being heated up by the bickering talk of the War on Christmas.' - Article

If Christmas was about Christ...

how does the Pine Tree tie in?

Did they find it in the desert?

And as for the 'war' on Christmas...

*Religious lobbying is changing political focus By Mercedes White Deseret News 11/21/2011

Number of lobbies has grown from 40 to over 200.

Seems to contradict itself when it's published by a paper...

that is owned, by a church.

Evidence that even the 'horrible' atheist's scientist's are tolerant of religion...

and religion uses it to try and 'discredit' those who choose not to believe as they do.

Great 'tolerance.'

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

"study also found some attend services because their spouse or partner is religious"

I would think that'd be a big cause for this stat.

DR Don
Salt Lake City, Ut

"Many atheist scientists take their kids to church"

I'm going to have to take exception to this headline. A mere 20%, one-fifth of atheist scientists, hardly seems worthy of an adjective such as "many". The term "some" would seem to be more appropriate and accurate since the overwhelming majority..:)..do not appear to participate in church/religious services.

A voice of Reason
Salt Lake City, UT

Pagan, Merry Christmas!

I invite you to visit temple square and if willing, to view the nativity scene. I also extend the invitation to all atheists, Christians, LDS, non-LDS, and all other groups of people. I personally and I'm sure many others will be happy to share our message with you.

Lagomorph
Salt Lake City, UT

patriot: "HA! If religion is so obviously dumb then why waste your kids time taking them to church?"

How about...
1) As noted in the article, taking children to church provides them with the knowledge to make an informed decision regarding their personal faith (or lack thereof), rather than blindly following their parents' belief system.
2) The U.S. is culturally Christian, even if not necessarily spiritually so or practicing. Christian memes run through our literature, arts, music, history, vocabulary, etc. Exposing children to Christian church services gives them the cultural understanding they need to function in society. They don't have to believe the content of the service, but they should know what it means.

the truth
Holladay, UT

RE: Pagan

So What!

So what if the christmas celebration absorbed some peasant (pagan) celebrations rituals (from trees to santa clause)

Really so what.

The most important thing has always been the celebration of Christ's Birth,

The most important and significant thing has been to take a time of the year and celebrate this very important event,

and so what if other things have been incorporated to make it more festive or help bring the peasants in in the past.

It seems even athiests can not deny Christs significance in our world.

JoeBlow
Miami Area, Fl

Regardless of what many claim, I don't think that anyone KNOWS.

So, I tell my kid the truth.

There are many "religious beliefs" in this country and this world.

Some believe in Jesus Christ, some in Buddha, some in Allah.

Others dont believe in any religion.

I don't know which if any are correct. These are things that you will
have to learn about and make your own decisions.

Now, I know that many of you think you "KNOW", but, in reality, I think you just believe strongly. And that is fine.

Mizzica
Orem, UT

The Truth: "It seems even athiests can not deny Christs significance in our world."

I believe you're correct, but it isn't the significance that you imply. Christians are a huge force in the world, as witnessed by the current political climate, especially among Republicans, in the US. Atheists certainly cannot deny that.

The title of this article is misleading in a couple of ways. Because Atheists take their families to church does not confirm a secret worship of Christ or a need for religion. The bulk of the article does a good job of pointing that out. I attend church weekly with my family, but it doesn't make me Christian; it makes me the father in a family that is predominantly Christian, and I support them in their sincere beliefs.

I also find the last paragraph misleading. Nothing in the article suggested that the Atheists in the article believed in any type of God. And of the 21% of Atheists in the Pew survey that believe in God, three quarters believed in god as either an "impersonal force" or "other/don't know." In all, it seems the author tried hard to slant the article to a pro-religion message that just isn't supported by the facts.

sb
SLC, UT

"Teach the children that the pure green color of the stately fir tree remains green all year round, depicting the everlasting hope of mankind, all the needles point heavenward, making it a symbol of man's thoughts turning toward heaven." (Teach the Children the True Meaning of Christmas, author unknown)

skeptic
Phoenix, AZ

It seems so many are very excited to talk about Christ, but very few of them act Christ like; so what is the real value of Christ. Can the supposed faithful really bamboozle their way into haven, or is it just one big act of man trying to tame his fear of death.

% A voice of Reason, I totally agree with you; the Mormon Temple Square is a very beautiful and special place to visit during the Christmas season.

ThatsSoUtah
Fredericksburg, VA

What percentage of the "faithful" of any religion go out of their way to expose their children to other viewpoints and ideas of religious beliefs?

I find it admirable that these parents are allowing their children to form their own opinions on things and wish that more parents would do the same. There are many groups who do everything they can to keep their kids away from differing opinions on things and avoid critical thinking. If you are so confident that what you believe is correct, then why should you worry about your child hearing someone else's opinion?

This has nothing to do with the atheist parent(s) believing in christ or any other supreme being, only with letting their kids figure it out on their own.

xert
Santa Monica, CA

I don't celebrate the religious aspects of the holiday, but I do insist that my children treat Santa Claus as one should a diety who can perform miracles (you know--the miracle of reindeer flight and the ascencion of the chiminey) and who gives us free stuff. They celebrate his coming by bringing gifts of milk and nutter butters, much as the wise me brought gold and muhr. I absolutely refuse, however--to allow them to believe that Mr. Claus is capable of giving them everlasting life as most religions believe that Jesus does. He can, however--make their earthly life better with material items.

Pagan
Salt Lake City, UT

'Pagan, Merry Christmas!
I invite you to visit temple square...' - A voice of Reason | 5:49 p.m. Dec. 7, 2011

I would VOR...

but I would probably be arrested.

*'Crowd turns out for Nationwide Kiss-In' - By James Thalman - Deseret News - 08/16/10

'The en masse public display of affection was staged to replicate actual incidents in recent weeks in which gay couples in three cities, including Salt Lake City, were detained or arrested by security guards...'

So, maybe not.

But:

Happy Hanukkah, Joyous Kwanzaa, Blessed and Merry Yule, Solstice Blessings, Io Saturnalia, Salamun 'Alaikum, Merry Christmas, God Jul, Happy Boxing Day, Las Posadas greetings, St. Nicholas Warm Wishes, Peace and Joy on Bodhi Day, Protections of the Virgin, Joyous Epiphany Celebration, and Happy New Year!

You are so tolerant! :)

L Kaiser
REDMOND, WA

My parents were both non religeous people, they stopped going to church shortly after marrying 37 years ago. Growing up we had a tree, celebrated christmas, went to midnight mass, had dinners, etc just like most religeous families. I asked my parents one time why we celebrate if were not religous? They said we celebrate for the joy of the season and culture of it, santa, presents, christmas tree's, cookies, dinners, etc and all for all people, they arent even found anywhere in the bible. As for mass, they said it was important for us kids to see why others celebrate christmas. Over the years we went to many services of other faiths. Its not surprising atheists take their kids to church, Most atheists are not like what you see in media. Private Prayer in schools, crosses on the highway, public nativity scenes, 10 commandments in courthouses, etc do not offend or bother them and they in fact find it as an expression of our culture. Its only when one's beliefs are used to directly Legislate anothers do you find an issue.

Ranch
Here, UT

@VoR;

I have a beautiful hand carved wooden Nativity Set. Just because I don't believe that Christ was the son of god (is there even a god?) doesn't mean there's no reason to enjoy the season.

Pagan
Salt Lake City, UT

'Pagan, Merry Christmas!
I invite you to visit temple square...' - A voice of Reason | 5:49 p.m. Dec. 7, 2011

I apologize.

Let me give you a more specific example.

*Survey shows some LGBT residents dont feel safe By Rosemary Winters SL Tribune 07/12/10

'A kiss between two men on the LDS Churchs Main Street Plaza that resulted in trespassing charges.

Again, I would LOVE to go to Temple. The lights during winter and flowers during summer are VERY nice. And a pleasant view.

But again...

I would probably be arrested.

lost in DC
West Jordan, UT

Pagan,
Solstice Blessings to you!

If you were tolerant of others' beliefs (notice I didn't even say "respectful") and did not engage in activities (public kiss-in) intentionally designed to provoke a reaction, you would be MORE than welcome on Temple Square. Hard to blame the bees for the stings when you intentionally kick in the beehive.

A voice of Reason
Salt Lake City, UT

lol, Pagan you got a real laugh out of that one.

I don't worship Santa or pine trees. I worship our Heavenly Father. I suspect that your family is/was LDS and you were brought up in the church. You may have even read the Book of Mormon. I think you know as much as anyone that the LDS Church doctrine is calculated only to promote happiness and freedom as we have explained it.

If you are welcomed into my peaceful home, and provoke contention, then you either must accept that you willfully chose to conflict in my home. Or if you still blame my rules, then I am guiltless regardless of my actions in your own home. You can't provoke conflict because you don't believe what I do, IN MY home, and call yourself tolerant. It defines intolerance.

Tolerance

I accept you doing whatever you want in your own home. I do what I want in mine. But provoking people on temple square is essentially you violating another persons home. We promote our views in democracy, sure... but our home, our rules. If you can't even accept that then I am not the intolerant one.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments