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Comments about ‘Utah Jazz would benefit from a few collective bargaining agreement options’

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Published: Sunday, Nov. 20 2011 8:33 p.m. MST

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Vince
the boonies, mexico

Good article and very truthful, however that said I am ready to accept a "no season" in the NBA this year and maybe next. The reason for this "GREED"!

christoph
Brigham City, UT

I think 22 out of 30 teams have been losing money for some time---translation: basketball is boring and dull and fewer people go to the games; no excuse to keep an 82 game season during the 2007-2009 recession. Cut it to permanent 45 game season with single game elimination playoffs (like college)--Dec thru April season, coaches and refs make $50,000 a year.

Tyler
Holladay, UT

christoph

Where did you come up with these changes? Make the seasons 70 games. Players and coaches tend to believe this would allow them to play healthy throughout the year and increase the entertainment value of each game. Single game elimination playoffs? No. Do they need to shorten the series? Yes, from the fans view. The thing is, the NBA and teams make more money for more games they play. This is why you ALWAYS see expansion in playoffs throughout sports. Last of all, $50,000 a year for coaches? It would be better for you to know more about the subject before you comment on it with arbitrary numbers. I don't think anyone would coach for so little when so much pressure is put on them because of the potential money winning gets teams.

Veracity
Morgan, UT

Let the players go to Europe and Asia and once they get there, let them stay.

DRay
Roy, UT

Gambling and money has ruined professional sports. Many only watch because they have bet money on a game, and afterwards, cannot remember who played, or often, who won. Real sports enthusiasts are the most basic component of any teams support, I believe, and if the NBA continues to alienate them, they are doomed to fail. Boredom with pro basketball comes from efforts to change the game to market it more extensively. I think people want genuine stories of real people, not hyped up athletes who get preferential treatment.

Kakashi
Tokyo, Japan

i dont know...im not an expert...but why not sell the NBA as a whole...as a Merchandise...Network TV and/or Cable can pay the NBA...for rights to show games...and divided to all Teams....as well as the tickets sold the entire season...and of course a hard cap...and lowering the salaries...i mean...5M dollars a year..anyone could live a good life for 5M a year...this is a sad part...for guys who were raised from poverty and suddenly they are millionaires...it gets into their brain...and they will waste away their money to buy a customed bentley...it would be sad if the Millers have to sell the Jazz...but if they do...i'll remain a fan of that team...

Maskmarv
Orem, UT

Shortening the season to 70 games is a bad idea. It would be like having the four-day work week fiasco the state of Utah tried out. Anyone in management knows you can't teach commitment. If a player slacks off during an 82 game season and wants 70 instead, then he'll also slack off during a 70 game season and call for 58. It is amazing on the other hand that during contract years the players always magically play tough for the entire season.

The reasons the NFL is so successful:

Hard-cap

Non-guaranteed contracts

Harsher penalties when players are out of line (hearing NBA players complain about a DRESS CODE AT WORK is absurd). The NBA is an entertainment business. Tiger Woods is a good example of the PR the NBA players are attempting. They don't understand brand management. When Tiger cheated on his wife his sponsorship money went way down. What do you think happens to the NBA brand when players are shooting guns, getting arrested, and knocking up women?

Actions have consequences and the players have been living in a fake world for too long not to know this.

Crotty Kid
Salt Lake City, UT

As a Jazz fan, I really hope the players don't have a valid lawsuit. I'm okay to take a season or two off if it means the Jazz can compete and remain in Utah for a long time. If the players successfully sue the owners and get the salaries they would have made from games missed during the lockout and maintain a similar collective bargaining agreement as before then we are done with professional basketball in Utah.

Doug10
Roosevelt, UT

the owners played this thing way smarter than did the players. When the owners showed up to the bargaining table they had a proposal. The players proposl was the owners soften their stance. The next time to the table the owners got even more while again throwing out an offer unpalatable to the players.

the players have become the party of no.

they have lost the pr battle and are in line to lose another battle in the courts

yarrlydarb
Ogden, UT

It's rather interesting that this: "Money always wins in the NBA" is the bottom line of this article.

We have two groups of greedy people fighting against each other.

However, the third group, which is the largest and most important, are the fans who pay all the bills and provide the profits.

People laugh, but the only true solution is for the ones who ultimately make out the greedy people's paychecks to go on strike.

I personally have watched my last Jazz game, or that of any other NBA team.

I'm not just on strike, I've filed for divorce and have been granted a final decree from my rocky and much too long marriage to the NBA.

I've witnessed my last slam dunk against the fans.

Bull
Layton, UT

I am amazed at how personal some of the fans are taking this lockout. You have every right to feel hurt and hatred towards the NBA, but some of you are little extreme. For me, however, I see this as part of correcting a bad business deal from ten years ago. This will be absolutely painful for both sides. Once you give your kids candy and then you try to take it away you are going to have a temper tantrum.
love watching the NBA and I find it a very exciting sport to watch. When it returns I will continue to watch. Do I feel the owners and the players are trying to stick to the fans? No. What I do want is a system where all teams can compete for a title. Therefore, I would side with the owners on what they are trying to get out of the new CBA.
Some of you want a shortened season, I agree it is long, that is what my wife says every year. But if you shorten the season the ticket prices are guaranteed to go up. Less games=less revenue. To maintain the current standard ticket prices rise.

xert
Santa Monica, CA

I watched a Barclays Premiere League game last night and really enjoyed it. A little soccer here, a little college bball there, toss in a hockey game every now and then and on other nights I might just read or watch a classic movie. Perhaps I'll take a class or go watch a high school game. I'm starting to see that becoming addicted the NBA regular season gets one in sort of a rut in the first place. Believe me, the world didn't come to an end when the Raiders left LA. Nobody really cares after a (very)short time and you never hear the topic of an NFL team come up in general conversation. So fight it out, you greedy owners and players. You are about to find out who really pays all of you and it might not be in the most positive way.

Tyler Ray
Taylorsville, UT

I'm with the owners all the way on this one! It's time for players to realize that loyalty is important, that they are filthy rich enough and get them to think for themselves. they're all the agents little puppets! And also I wish they would got back to the rules before Mj left. After he left they called double the fouls because they thought more fouls would mean more points and that would be exciting. This is why Kobe scores so much, half of his points come at the foul after jumping into a defender!

Carnak
Salt Lake City, UT

Stand firm owners even if it costs the NBA an entire season.

Jazz Source
Alpine, UT

The owners need to hang tough and get it fixed.

Follow the money and it in most cases it leads to championships....at least that is the only way you have a shot at getting a championship.

Hard cap would be sweet. Non-guaranteed deals would be even sweeter.

If we could have had those 2 things in place along with LHM and Jerry Sloan I think the results would have been different here.

This organization and other small markets have been operating with the equivalent of 1 1/2 good players tied behind their back. Always in the position of having to have literally everything go their way to even have a shot.

Normally I am a free market guy and I certainly am in the real world but with these sports leagues you have to have some socialism in order for them to work. If all the bad teams failed you would have a 4-6 team basketball league (those in big markets) and how many people get interested in that? Exactly zero national interest which may result in the entier market disappearing.

Personally I'm enjoying alot of NFL now. Awesome sport and league.

Are you listening NBA?

Large Tuna
Salt Lake City, UT

very informative article. Although i think people are tying "winning" with "financial success" too closely when talking about teams. You clearly don't have to be a good team to stay in business. The obvious examples to that are the Clippers and the Timberwolves. Are they struggling? I'm sure they are, but I don't think they're on the verge of folding. From what I've heard, the Clippers owner is pretty frugal and he doesn't really care that his team isn't competitive because they are decent enough to bring enough money in to stay afloat. Competitively speaking, its not what any fan wants to hear, but financially speaking, its actually not a bad rule to follow. Not saying I'm for that model of sports business, just pointing it out that it is possible to have a consistently bad team and not go bankrupt. The best two teams to counter argue the point of winning=success are the Lakers and Spurs. Spurs are considered a small market, they have 4 rings in 10 years. Lakers spent the most last year and didn't get make the finals. Just something to think about.

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