Comments about ‘How it matters if candidate is LDS’

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Published: Tuesday, Nov. 8 2011 9:18 a.m. MST

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Radically Moderate
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

I have read a lot of comments by atheists who are upset at the high number of Americans who say that they wont vote for an atheist. These numbers are much higher than the numbers for Muslims and Mormons. The problem is that when the public things of Mormons, they think of Polygamists; when they think of Muslims they think of Terrorists, and when they think of Atheists they think of Anti-Religious extremists bent on the eradication of all expression of faith, both public and private. Personally, I believe that the last group of extremists is just as small a proportion of Atheists and Agnostics as the other groups are of Mormons or Muslims. The problem, however, is that meeting Mormons or Muslims usually is sufficient to dispel such myths: meeting Atheists doesnt seem to have the same effect.

Perhaps it is because not enough understanding and tolerant unbelievers are involved in the process, or perhaps its because they are unwilling to distance themselves from their more outspoken, offensive, unsympathetic, easily offended and downright uncivil coopinionists (yes I made that word up because coreligionists doesnt seem to fit). What do you think?

MoJules
Florissant, MO

If an atheist were running, and he had a good sense for the economy and was willing to defend this country and would not promote liberal ideas, I would vote for them. And if a Mormon were running and I didn't agree with them, such as Harry Reid, I would not vote for them. And Utter, it does matter, cause chances are Romney will be the GOP candidate and his numbers are good against Obama.

junkgeek
Agua Dulce, TX

"If an atheist were running, and he had a good sense for the economy and was willing to defend this country and would not promote liberal ideas, I would vote for them."

So you're one of those straight-ticket voting Republicans?

Ross
Madison, AL

Political hyperbole has so taken over the discussion about the GOP presidential candidates, it has become the center of the discussion and not what the candidates are saying. Hyperbole is exaggeration to evoke strong feelings or create a strong impression of something that may be completely bogus. When repeated enough it gains a certain legitimacy. Unfortunately tactics of some candidates are hyperbole alone with no basis in any fact whatsoever. In the end there will have been so much misinformation that the voters will have to resort to whatever truthmeter they trust to select their candidate of choice. Mormon bashing will in the end only elevate the public sentiment because it is so outrageous. The planned deception of the populus seems to be what the news we hear is all about.

aumacoma
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

What we are seeing today is a culmination of many years of religion pretending to be politics. Religion should not be playing any part of a Secular Democratic Representative Republic such as the USA. History has shown over and over again that a Theocratic Government is not such a good idea (can you say, Middle East?)
"When Fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross" Sinclair Lewis

Kith
HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA

Aumacoma I mostly agree with you. However, it is unlikely if impossible to not have someone's beliefs influence their decisions. That's like saying that your morals wouldn't affect yours. The question is whether he is honest and will act as he said he would, submit to the will of the people, and follow and enforce all laws whether he agrees with them or not as he is supposed to. In my opinion.

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