Comments about ‘Women married to NFL Mormons do best to keep things normal at home’

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Published: Wednesday, Oct. 19 2011 9:06 p.m. MDT

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anti-liar
Salt Lake City, UT

I'm sure these are all very nice and very good people. And I am not going to fault them.

But...

Why do so many in the Church glorify and worship sports, sports figures, various other celebrities, fame, stardom, and astronomical salaries? Why are LDS celebrities held up as emblems of just how cool the church and church membership is -- as though the plain-old doctrine, and the Power of God unto Salvation, aren't groovy enough on their own merits to attract people to the church and encourage them to stay?

Why is there this business of, "Yes, the Sabbath Day, BUT, professional sports is an exception," and rationalized with, "LDS athletes bring so much positive attention to the church" -- to where ward members are feeling like they'd better be "sensitive when discussing Sabbath Day observance around the Weddles?" And how confusing is this double standard to the young people?

Indeed, what of the Sabbath Day? What about Eric Liddell, the Christian and Olympic athlete, portrayed in the movie "Chariots of Fire," who refused to participate in the Olympics on Sunday -- who was far less concerned about the approval of the world, than he was about the Glory of God?

Kelley
Spanish Fork, UT

Great article. It can't be easy living in the limelight. I wish you would have included Pua Lutui. I'd like to see how she and Deuce balance the demands of Sundays in the NFL and faith and family.

Timp
South Jordan, UT

Yeah, tough life. Feel sorry for these millionaire stay at home wives and their struggles.

jenrmc
Fort Worth, TX

@anti-liar:

Actually you did judge them. As far as why the attention paid to members of the Church isn't conducive to the teachings of the Church (in your opinion) why do you care? Personal choices of how to respond to someone's profession are yours to make but condemning another person's choice is not your right. Comparing two people's behavior is asinine and judging another person is against the teachings of Jesus Christ. Perhaps more emphasis should be placed on the good experiences people add to society instead of the lapses made in judgment that we perceive. As far as being mindful of mentioning Sabbath Day observance sensitively, isn't that showing love and consideration? You can mention the teaching but do so in a non-condemning way and still accomplish the goal of transferring knowledge. As far as a double standard to youth why not take this opportunity to discuss your beliefs and the way you live you life and why you feel your choice is right for you and your family. This could be a great discussion opportunity that can easily be marred by judgment and condemnation.

Dadof8
Pleasant Grove, UT

wow....how easy some rush to judgment. One of the beauties of the gospel is that we have agency to choose, yet some of the responses show bitterness and self-righteousness. I find it refreshing to know that in a career choice that glamorizes their lives there are some who are making conscious efforts to maintain their roots, family values, and testimonies. Perhaps we can get ideas on how to do the same in our lives. Do you think that MIGHT have been the point of the article???

TJ
Eagle Mountain, UT

Anti-liar
Clearly you don't really care what the answer to your questions are. Your intent is to stir up controversy. I am sure you will continue if you reply to this. I will answer your questions anyway. LDS do not worship or idolize any sports team or figure. There are fans, superfans and some who don't care. Anyone from any walk of life, can be LDS as long as they are willing to live LDS standards. As for Sabbath observance; There are many professions that require working on the sabbath. Like anyone else, when one chooses a profession, this is only one of many aspects of a job to consider. Firemen, Police officers, anyone who works at a hospital, people who work retail and professional athletes are required to work on the Sabbath. Some college athletes who are LDS are required to play on the Sabbath. It is a personal choice. The LDS church does not punish anyone for choosing a profession where they are required to work on the Sabbath any more than they do a Police officer or a Doctor. As you can see by the examples in this article, these people remain devoted to their religion.

Cats
Somewhere in Time, UT

There will always be unhappy people who will attack successful people out of envy and bitterness. That's just so sad.

JeffE
Grantsville, UT

I'm not a pro ball player, or a policeman, or a fireman, or a paramedic, but my work sometimes requires that I work on the sabbath due to project deadlines that are outside of my control. Football players are scheduled to work 15 times or less each year on the sabbath if you factor in bye weeks, and possibly playing on Thursday or Monday. I come close to that myself.

The commandments are here to bless our lives, not to provide ammo to condem each other. If we make choices that take us away from the blessings of obedience, it is between us and the Lord.

The gospel teaches us to explore and pursue our talents. Many people follow this to a career choice. If someone excells at something, especially in an area that has a lot of public interest, it can be a great missionary tool. When I lived in Texas I had a lot of discussions about Steve Young since the 49ers were major rivals of the Cowboys. This almost always led to discussions about what Mormons believe.

SportzFan
Salt Lake City, UT

jenrmc, Dadof8 and TJ -- what is it called when someone judges someone for judging?

FredEx
Salt Lake, Ut

There will always be the issue of playing professional sports on Sunday, but to my knowledge, the LDS church has never made any statement condoning it. I've never heard that it's OK because it brings positive attention to the church. So, if there is a finger to be pointed, it should be pointed at the individual who made the choice, not the organization to which that individual belongs.

Honor Code
Denver, Colorado

16 weeks for the millions that they make...........and you come up with a story about how "tough" it is for these women???? PUUUULEASE!

yankees27
Heber, Utah

Anti-Liar- Will you be voting for Mitt? Just wondering, because politicians work lots of Sundays. I can only imagine how really out of control the Republican nominations would get if Mitt came out and said " I'm there for you America, except Sundays"

I really feel for those who are judgmental.

jenrmc
Fort Worth, TX

@SportzFan:

I wasn't judging. I was attempting to give feedback on statements made. I saw flaws in logic that I was addressing. I did initially make a comment that this poster was actually judging which was an opinion on my part but not a statement of condemnation. Had it been then I would have added that "you should be ashamed of yourself" or something along those lines.

BrianS
Martinsburg, WV

I find that sports is not glorified in the church. In the East you will find many wards where few young men take part in sports because it takes away from scouts/young men/seminary. Sundays, people are not preoccupied with football because they rarely get to see a Sunday game.

As for the fascination with professional athletes, I think people have the same reaction. It is not the professional athlete, so much as the common background. I get equally excited with professional athletes that came from my small high school. I love seeing people from my college playing pro football or basketball.

Eric Liddell's chosen field was running. Track and field was rarely held on Sundays. It certainly reflected well on him to choose honoring the sabbath over running, but there were many more days when he could compete. For the professional football player it would be the end of their career to stop competing on Sundays.

Finally, the high visibility of pro athletes makes for great missionary opportunities. Remember when Ezra Taft Benson was Secretary of Agriculture, he was told that was his calling, though it took time away from the Church.

So. Cal Reader
Escondido, CA

Loved the article! Bless the hearts of these women and their families. We LOVE having the Weddles in our Stake. They are the "salt of the earth" type of family-- very, very down to earth and very committed to their callings. Bro. Weddle has been very gracious to speak to the youth of our stake on a couple occasions.

Rikitikitavi
Cardston, Alberta

@anti-liar
All young folks need positive role models so severely lacking in the growing up years. LDS kids (and others as well) need to have honorable heroes and role-models to look to just in case they end up in similar roles. Same goes for entertainers like Brandon Flowers and others. High profile celebs can be Christ-like even as LDS members. You are condemning these athletes for choosing to pursue careers which ultimately led to Sunday work. So what!! NO one REALLY cares what you think. These wives do not need your permission to enjoy the results of the hard work and the sweat and pain their spouses have endured. My opinion is simply it is not my role (or yours either) to judge what is in the hearts of these folks. Let others live their lives and lay off the judging and condemnation. The major risk all need to understand is that frequent absence from Sunday services will not always work out for the best. The fact remains that young people are going to look to role models as they pursue their dreams. Let's all congratulate the positive ones. It could be your kid!

Dadof8
Pleasant Grove, UT

@SportzFan
A general comment about the responses is judgmental? Didn't point to any one specific just the overall tone of the responses. So how is that judgmental?

SportzFan
Salt Lake City, UT

jenrmc, Dadof8 and TJ and Rikitikitavi -- what is it called when someone judges someone for judging?

"Comparing two people's behavior is asinine and judging another person is against the teachings of Jesus Christ. "

"One of the beauties of the gospel is that we have agency to choose, yet some of the responses show bitterness and self-righteousness."

"Anti-liar
Clearly you don't really care what the answer to your questions are. Your intent is to stir up controversy."

"You are condemning these athletes for choosing to pursue careers which ultimately led to Sunday work. So what!! NO one REALLY cares what you think. My opinion is simply it is not my role (or yours either) to judge what is in the hearts of these folks."

anti-liar
Salt Lake City, UT

@jenrmc

You missed the point. I have not judged the actual athletes nor their families. Instead I am offering a reasonable criticism of the culture -- for its logical inconsistency as regards a purported Gospel STANDARD: i.e., teaching, in the name of keeping the Sabbath Day holy, that we don't engage in active sports on Sunday, but then saying that it's okay -- indeed, that it is a GLORIOUS thing -- for a professional athlete to do so. And so I'll ask the question again: how do you explain this clear double-standard to the youth of the Church? Sports on Sunday is ESSENTIAL, the way medical care, police, and firemen are???

And I have found, in my first-hand observation, a need on the part of many in Mormon culture to garner the praise and approval of the World. Why do I care, you ask? Because this sends the wrong message to the youth of the Church, who should be taught instead to have no other gods before the True and Living God.

I suggest you watch the movie, Chariots of Fire.

And by the way: you judged me. So much for "judge not under any circumstances."

Duckhunter
Highland, UT

The comments on this article sure went in a predictable direction.

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