Comments about ‘Wright Words: Questions about Mitt Romney's faith are fair game’

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Published: Monday, Oct. 17 2011 7:06 p.m. MDT

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yurana
SANDY, UT

FAith is not fair game only character. Anyone who has belonged to any faith knows people they would not associate with. So faith in and of itself is too narrow. it always comes down to the person.

El Chango Supremo
Rexburg, ID

I disagree... A local radio host in Arizona was railing on Mitt Romney during the last election cycle, saying that he needs to answer questions about his faith. I called the show to challenge his points. When I talked to the call screener, I was met with a bunch of classic anti-mormon arguments. On air, they were attempting to sound like they simply wanted questions answered, but when no one else was listening, they were just looking to smear a religion.

There are so many other people running for office who belong to various different religions... Catholic, Pentecostal, Baptist, Methodist, Jewish, Lutheran, 7th day Adventist, etc... why don't they have to explain how their faith would affect them, but we do?

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

It's tough to figure out where the line is but... there are some things that might affect a voter's view. If a church, for example, had a strong anti-semitic stance then a candidate of that faith would have that be a legitimate issue to Jewish voters. After all, there are some LDS voters who have voiced in these discussion boards that candidates like Huckabee last time or Perry this time lost their votes (or chances for their votes) because of things said by them or their surrogates that seemed anti-mormon which is a faith-based rejection of a candidate (oftentimes not solely faith-based, but that's still a part of it nonetheless). So there are legitimate faith related questions and concerns that can come up.

Midway
Salt Lake City, UT

Questions about the faith are fair. Smearing the faith are not - and that is what the majority of those bringing up the faith issue are doing.

CougarKeith
Roy, UT

The writer here obviously isn't sharing the same view of Obama? Obama never came clean of HIS FAITH, only that he did attend a odd doctrined church in Chicago led by one Reverend Wright, based on Black liberation Theology. He slipped in an interview talking about his "Muslim Faith", but nothing was made of that, he couldn't even produce a VALID BIRTH CERTIFICATE!!! No Certified State Seal, and questionable Etching on the boarder which could appear "Doctored". He changed his name to an Obvious Muslim Name, his Indonesian records state him as a INDONESIAN CITIZEN, not a US CITIZEN, and his religion as "ISLAM" not "Catholic" which was the school he attended where the laws of Indonesia at the time required lessons in ISLAM! Yet there is no big push into Barack Husein Obama's Religious Background, or his true citizenship. Yet here is a man who was born in the states, raised in an AMERICAN BASED FAITH, served a faithful Mission, was an EAGLE SCOUT, has been a governor, organized a very SUCCESSFUL OLYMPICS after scandle recognized and he took over, speaks a foreign language, successful businessman, as well as he's had REAL JOBS! Yet Media attacks Him??? Get Real!

JoeBlow
Miami Area, Fl

"why don't they (other candidates) have to explain how their faith would affect them, but we do? "

Let me try.

- main reason - The LDS believe that their church is run by a Prophet. They believe that this person gets revelation directly from God.

Many of the LDS that I know are extremely obedient(in my mind, to a fault) to their Religion and their Leaders. They take guidance in virtually every aspect of their lives.

So, if you are a STAUNCH follower, and the person you believe to be a prophet of God, tells you to do something, how could you possibly ignore it?

Now, do I believe that Romney or Huntsman would bow to a call by church leadership, or that church leadership would MAKE that call in the first place? NO, not a chance of either.

Secondly, "you are a peculiar people" . Your religion is more "different" than most religions that people are familiar with. It would be the same with a JW or a Scientologist. Just the way it is in the Big Leagues.

People "think" they know about the other candidates religion. Therefore no explanation necessary.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

"I'm also a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It is the only faith I have ever known, and it's all I've ever wanted to know. I suspect the same is true of Romney."

It is the only faith I have ever known, and it's all I've ever wanted to know - Maybe that lack of culture and ethnocentrism is what keeps people from wanting to like Romney.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@CougarKeith,

"Yet here is a man who was born in the states, raised in an AMERICAN BASED FAITH, served a faithful Mission, was an EAGLE SCOUT, has been a governor, organized a very SUCCESSFUL OLYMPICS after scandle recognized and he took over, speaks a foreign language, successful businessman, as well as he's had REAL JOBS! "

American Based Faith - is this a prerequisite for office? America is a medley of different faiths so stop acting like Romney's LDS faith makes him an heir to the throne. You just stoke the fire for White Horse prophecy comments.

Served a Mission - a conversion mission is not a charity mission and doesn't garner the same appreciation and respect.

Eagle Scout - Good stuff there although it means absolutely nothing to a presidency.

Foreign Language, Business Success, Olympics, Governor, etc .. - that's all good!

Just cleaning up your arguments for Romney since a few were completely irellevent and only stated YOUR reasons for liking him, as opposed to true principles on why he's good for the country.

majmajor
Layton, UT

CougarKeith | 1:58 a.m. Oct. 18, 2011
Roy, UT
"The writer here obviously isn't sharing the same view of Obama? Obama never came clean of HIS FAITH, only that he did attend a odd doctrined church in Chicago led by one Reverend Wright, based on Black liberation Theology. He slipped in an interview talking about his "Muslim Faith"...."

Your rant is exactly why one should not listen to the hate filled talks of the extreme left or right. Every thing that you addressed are lies of the right. The anti-Mormon community is doing the same thing as your comments. If one wants to be treated civilly, one must treat the opponent civilly.

Don't give into the lies of either extreme. Show courage and filter out the wacko comments. Concentrate on the policy issues. Those are the only ones that should count.

Don't give into the hate.

Resistance
Lehi, UT

It's interesting that so many people have so many ways to justify hating. I think if we disagree with someones politics, that's one thing. But using religion for political gain is wrong. Especially when you are lying about someone not being a Christian. I could easily vote for a Jew or an evangelical, it's not so easy to vote for a person whose Christian church curses America, but I would have done it if I didn't disagree with so many other things about Obama, but I really can't vote for someon who thinks I'm a cultist and intentionally misinforms people about me.

skeptic
Phoenix, AZ

It seems Romney is much more comfortable and compatiable with the Koch brothers than with most Mormons.

aumacoma
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

All this religious bickering needs to stop. We are a Democracy not a Theocracy. All this is proving exactly why our constitution says religion and politics need to stay out of each others business. But now we have religion pretending to be politics. This is a very dangerous situation. It was said decades ago that when Fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross. Well, it looks like we are almost there.

ciaobello
Concord, CA

I like your answers. I still stand by my reasoning that a candidate should not be asked about his or her religion, especially in this day and age where information is so readily available from the source itself, if people are so interested.

Common Ground
Salt Lake City, UT

First, this writer is confusing a person's personal values (character) with his religion (or the church he attends) - the first is relevant, the second is not. It is fair to ask a candidate about his values or how he makes decisions, but he or she should not be asked to explain or defend the teachings of his church or pastor (the constitution prohibits it).

Second, for an elected official to base his governing decisions on his religion is wrong and is the first step toward becoming like Iran or Saudi Arabia. That's why Rick Perry is so scary and why Mitt Romney says it's not an issue - he knows he must represent and work in the best interest of all Americans, not just those that share his religion.

The Lord will reign when He comes - in the meantime, he has told us to "render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's."

ciaobello
Concord, CA

To LValfre regarding Romney serving a mission and working for his Eagle Scout try to look behind what these achievements represent, that help everyone: keeping to a strict schedule as a young person, making and keeping appointments, meeting new people, being proactive, learning many new skills by deadlines. Perhaps that's what the poster meant. Many people put these two life achievements on their resume, and are proud to do it.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@ciaobello,

I'm well aware of the character building traits and habits that can come from doing either or, just as in playing sports or being involved in various other groups or organizations. To state them as valuable for the presidency? Ludicrous. Nobody without basic skills such as discipline, self management, etc etc etc are every going to even make it to be a candidate let alone get elected. I hold my ground that it was completely irrelevant.

CougarKeith was stating his reason for wanting Romney in office, which had to do with being in the same church among other factors, as opposed to why America needs him.

Ross
Madison, AL

Integrity, honesty, civility, family values, fidelity in marriage, self reliance, Love of God and his 10 commandments the basis for US law, hard working, attention to detail, compassion for the suffering, lifting others without hurting them. The values that Mitt Romney stands for are rare indeed in today's world. These are the values of liberty. Tyranny which we have had way too much of lately, is what we get if these values are boring to us.

no fit in SG
St.George, Utah

It does not matter how people try to spin it, the LDS/Mormon religion is very different from other religions and cultures.
The confusion seems to be with those who have experienced, primarily, the LDS/Mormon culture.
Many of our parents had us attend many Churches of many different religions as we grew to adulthood. We would accompany our friends and their families. Our parents wanted us to have these experiences in order that we might be able to make an educated/spiritual decision on which religion suited us the best.
When discussing this subject with "one of us", we will tell you that the LDS/Mormon religion !S definitely very different from any other religion.
I am not saying the LDS/Mormon religion is better or worse from other religions. However, to one who has never been in the LDS atmosphere, Church, General conference, Temple, etc., LDS concepts are difficult for many to understand and accept.

m.g. scott
LAYTON, UT

I agree with Jason Wrights opinion. When asked about his religion, Mitt Romney should talk of how it informs his political and world view. Nothing to be ashamed of. It would be a shame however if Americans voted based upon all of the false nonsense one hears or reads about Mormons. Let the truth get out there and the votes fall where they may.

skeptic
Phoenix, AZ

%Ross; How is it that you feel Romney is different in the aspects you outline from other prominent politicians. They all put on a good face, it is their success of public contribution where they differ, and Romney has not shown any exceptional success or abilities that would distinguish him from the others, or what we presently have.

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