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Parents of special needs kids start Easy to Love, Hard to Raise

Published: Friday, Oct. 14 2011 11:13 p.m. MDT

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MyChildrensKeeper
Taylorsville, UT

Raising children with any disorder or handicap is very difficult becasue our economy, and society is not developed or designed to incorporate them so everything is costly special design to accommodate their needs.

Then I think every needy child with every disease or disorder are becoming pawns in a disability war to get funds and grants from government. Schools get it and is the only reason many of these children are allowed in the education system, emotional and physical acceptance by society.

But the war of disorders is more complex becasue each disability is the result of different genetic mutations. Because of the vastness and widespread higher percentage of mutations in our population now we should be challenging the creators of these mutations, drug companies and genetic food modifiers altering the state of our beastly existence and ability to reproduce non mutated children.

We, the US, are a nation of Thalidomide adults and children that has been covered up and hidden from the public by FDA and Monsanto profiteering. Our food is not deemed fit for human consumption by the rest of the world and food and seed are banned. We are the creators and consumers of genetic disorders.

Mayfair
City, Ut

To the parents who have difficulty getting fruits and vegetables into kids, how about a vitamix? Just recently had chocolate ice cream made in one that contained cabbage, spinach and avacado. You absolutely couldn't tell. Also smoothies full of various vegetables and fruits that tasted like sorbet. Have heard of friends or family members who have bought one together to afford the cost.

Rob
Logan, UT

We parents of handicapped kids appreciate all the help we can get. I look at others and admire how strong they are and how they keep going. Having a support system makes such a difference. I see what some families go through and feel like I have it so much easier than they do. Thank you for this story. I can't imagine having a child that didn't want to be touched. That would be so hard.
Wow MyChildrensKeeper, I guess you wanted to use this story to sound off. We have some of the safest food in the World. Please go and volunteer in other Countries and you will have your eyes opened as to how safe our food is here. Also go and help a family or two who have handicapped children. Helping someone out will sure make a difference in your life. Maybe instead of ranting about something you can lighten someones load.

Nan BW
ELder, CO

We raised one very difficult child, but he was never diagnosed with anything. I would like to see better research into the reason we are seeing such an increase in these disorders. I have far more questions than answers, but I want all parents to know that I pray for all of you. Parenting is a monemental undertaking, and more so when there are serious complications.

483bzac
West Valley City, UT

How refreshing to have an article dealing with some of these children and parents who are facing unique challenges!

Another aspect that may not be mentioned is that I believe a parent can "know and feel" what a child is going through better than most others because of the genetic similarities. One understands because of the same challenge or chemical imbalance. They can also know of solutions to problems, having found them by life lessons.

In our society where divorce is common and somewhere around 50 percent of children do not live with both "genetic contributors," non-biological caregivers generally are just not as good.

I say that it is important to get along with the "other" non-custodial/custodial parent in order to facilitate child growth and development.

jglennon
FLETCHER, NC

Often times we think difficult children cannot learn or we don't understand enough about their disabilities to create change.

My son was diagnosed with ADHD. Specialist after specialist told us all we could do was medicate. As a former elementary school principal, I knew that wasn't going to solve his problems; medication teaches nothing and he was short on many cognitive skills.

We finally discovered two options that worked for us: Play Attention (www.playattention.com) and ADHD Nanny (www.adhdnanny.com). They teach cognitive skills, attention training and organization. I know there must be more, but it was a real beast finding the right fit. It's important we share this information to make the road easier for each other. Life's often difficult enough when raising a child with ADHD or any other disability.

Truthseeker
SLO, CA

My heart goes out to these children and their families. I wonder what type of education is done for schools and children attending school with these children? I would think that educating classmates might help students have a better understanding and increase cooperation and empathy. Has this been shown to be helpful?
There is so much we still don't know about the brain. Science is advancing, but never quickly enough for families struggling with these challenges.

blueskyco
Home Town, CO

I would love a parents' group like this! I have a son with some of these issues, and it can be very isolating to me, as a mom, and him, too.

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