Comments about ‘My view: Don't allow environmental meltdown’

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Published: Tuesday, Sept. 13 2011 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Irony Guy
Bountiful, Utah

Environmental degradation doesn't bother the Perry-Bachmann axis. Heaven only knows why these people call themselves "conservatives" when they are against conserving anything.

Blue
Salt Lake City, UT

People should pay closer attention to the countries of the world that are living examples of nations that have fully embraced GOP/Tea Party values. China's toxic air and water are testaments to the consequences of letting corporate profits take priority over public health. Iran's brutal, repressive theocracy is a testament to what happens when the line of separation between church and state is erased.

KDave
Moab, UT

Did you really say that Republicans are responsible for the 'Asian Brown Cloud,?

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

How does getting rid of the EPA equate to deregulation? None of the canidates have called for deregulation. The EPA should be done away with, and have state EPA like agencies there to enforce state and federal environmental laws.

Happy Valley Heretic
Orem, UT

Come on Utah We can beat China in pollution we were number 1 several times last year.
Our goal should be to not be able to see any mountains surrounding our valleys.

GOP- Government of Polluters

21stCenturySLC
Salt Lake City, UT

@Red Shirt You're incorrect. Lots of national GOP candidates support deregulation and privatization in an effort to shift more power to states and make more money for corporations with no rules(again think China.) Lots of GOP led states are advocating for state sovereignty. Current Utah delegates seek (via a lawsuit with the federal government)to drill on federal lands and refuse to protect ANY "jewels" of our wilderness areas in UT which are numerous. You don't have to be an environmental activist to think this doesn't make any sense for the human beings, the voters, in our nation.

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

Re: Irony Guy | 1:30 a.m. Sept. 13, 2011

443,000 Americans die each year of smoking related illnesses. I have to chuckle when I hear smokers complaining about the quality of our air. Thank goodness Republicans in Utah pushed the Clean Air Act which forces smokers to exhale outside.

Thinkin\' Man
Rexburg, ID

False analogy -- the Chinese and Americans do not think the same about industry or environment (or many other things!) What is happening there would not happen here for that reason.

Brother Chuck Schroeder
A Tropical Paradise USA, FL

I will now quote first: "Chinese authorities admit that 750,000 of their citizens die from air pollution and 60,000 from water pollution annually. Outside organizations think that is a gross underestimation. The Chinese Ministry of Health admits pollution has made cancer the leading cause of death in China, followed by respiratory and heart diseases, also related to air pollution. Only 1 percent of the country's 560 million city dwellers breathe air considered safe by the European Union. All of China's major cities are constantly blanketed by the same choking, toxic gray shroud, the "China Syndrome."" We saw this when they had their Olimpics over there. Here's what we don't see. The Koch brothers are being among the 17 polluters and deniers who are derailing efforts to curb global warming. Koch brothers' network works hard to advance a right-wing ideological agenda that helps their businesses reap more profits at the expense of our environment, our economy, and the American middle class. Understanding how they operate is the first step in countering their efforts to reshape our nations laws to benefit the wealthy even more than they do today.

Don't go there about of smoking related illnesses.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "But most Americans aren't joining in the political pummeling of the EPA."

Yeah they are.

It's really only out-of-touch rich guys, like physicians, and their allies in Hollywood and academe, together with a few back-East, left-coast, and East-bench liberals that don't mind the countless billions in extra regulatory and bureaucratic expense we have added to the cost of our goods and services to support the few uber-radical greenies who refuse to admit that the EPA has worked itself out of a job.

Turn over environmental regulation to the states, who know best the proper way to balance the competing interests, and have the most to gain from clean air and water.

Happy Valley Heretic
Orem, UT

procuradorfiscal | 12:13 p.m. Sept. 13, 2011
Tooele, UT
Re: "But most Americans aren't joining in the political pummeling of the EPA."

No they're NOT.

and the states have proven their in ability to make environmental decisions that benefit Citizens instead of lobbyists buying politicians, see Kennecott get what they wish see magcorp pollute more see Lee wants to import radioaactive waste.

WHAT NOW?
Saint George, UT

Red Shirt/procuradorfiscal:

"...have State EPA agencies...".

"...Turn over environmental regulation to the states...".

One example:

A contiguous state, Nevada, approves the construction of a coal-fired or a series of coal-fired plants along a common border. The prevailing wind carries the "pollution" from Nevada into Utah. Nevada has a need for jobs as well as an improved tax base; Utah has a need for clean air.

Since you tend to advocate for "States Rights", how does this case get resolved, when "states rights" are considered supreme, yet each state has a compelling rationale for their respective positions?

If the two states cannot resolve their differences, what next?

The SCOTUS has proven to be for sale to the highest bidder (Citizens United).

Clean air in Utah becomes a secondary distant dream compared to the primary reality of corporate donations flowing into the coffers of the powerbrokers/decision makers/change agents in DC?

If Nevada or Utah don't get their way, do they leave the country ala Rick Perry?

Since "compromise" has become toxic, how do two competing interests find common ground?

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "Since "compromise" has become toxic, how do two competing interests find common ground?"

Maybe they don't. That's why Article III, Section 2 of the Constitution extends the judicial power to controversies between 2 states. In practice, adjoining states are much more likely to agree than litigate, but the courts are there, if needed.

All meaningful environmental regulation is accomplished at the state level, anyway, at a much lower cost and with much better results than when the EPA steps in directly.

The federal EPA exists today solely as a sop to tiny, but well-funded radical special-interest groups, who contribute way too heavily to politicians of all stripe.

Those special interests and bureaucratic inertia are all that stand between us and reasonable, well-run, much more efficient environmental regulators.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "WHAT NOW? | 2:03 p.m." again, how does getting rid of the EPA prevent regulations from being enacted by Congress, as they currently are? What other liberals have claimed today is that the EPA is merely an enforcement arm of the government that does not create rules or regulations.

So, if we got rid of the Federal EPA in favor of state run EPA offices, what would change? The environmental protection laws would still be in place, and would be enforced.

The onlything that could change would be EPA created rules and regulations that have not passed through congress, but according to the liberals that does not happen.

WHAT NOW?
Saint George, UT

Red Shirt/procuradorfiscal:

Thank both of you for taking the time to consider and write a response to my comment.

One final question:

Regarding your faith in the court system, if by some miracle, the Affordable Healthcare Bill is deemed constitutional, I wonder if your "faith" in the judicial system will rival mine (re: Citizens United)?

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "WHAT NOW? | 6:33 p.m." I have little faith in the Federal Court system. You should know that I have even less faith in Federal Government oversight, and in the Federal Government in general.

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