Comments about ‘NBA lockout for dummies’

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Published: Thursday, June 30 2011 9:19 p.m. MDT

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souptwins
Lindon, UT

What? Is the entire copy desk on vacation? Lots of mistakes in this one, easy ones too. I was reading for information but got side tracked by all the typos and grammatical problems.

Jazz Source
Alpine, UT

Well, somebody got it wrong. I just read the article on ESPN and they said:

"About 90 percent of NBA players get paid from Nov. 15 through April 30, so they won't be missing checks for a while. But Stern has warned that the offers only get worse once a lockout starts, so the league could try to push through elements of its original proposal when bargaining resumes."

So which is it? Do they get paid or not? I can't imagine they do or they would be thrilled to get paid without performing...most of them fall into this category anyway based on the way they play.

Anonigma
Murray, UT

Nuts,if they get paid then we might not have NBA next year at all. I really hope they don't.

I haven't been following this stupid thing, but it seems to me that cutting the player's salaries cold turkey isn't a good idea...perhaps cutting the salaries more gradually (IE: 10% first year, 25% next, 33% third) would work better...

But I dunno...they probably already discussed this option.

EJM
Herriman, UT

Don't be surprised if the NBA goes an entire year on the lockout. Then NFL had better get theirs done. The NBA could become an afterthought.

utahmtnman
Park City, UT

Is the Jazz one of the 22 teams losing money? I'd like to see an article assessing the overall financial health of the Jazz--the strenghts, weaknesses, etc.

Chewbacca
Magna, UT

Why would the owners want shorter rookie contracts? That doesn't make any sense to me, especially for the small market teams. Wouldn't you want to hang on to a young talent for as long as you can? Once that rookie contract goes away the salarie explode for talented players.

JFFR
Salt Lake City, UT

@Chewbacca... maybe because of players like Mo Almond who have to get paid about $2million/yr while playing in the D-league?

Screwdriver
Casa Grande, AZ

The owners don't like the free market because the players get paid too much that way. They effectively want thier manipulated market the safe as the NFL with sallary caps. So commy of them.

OrlandoJazzFan
Winter Springs, FL

@ Jazz Source Players get paid????

No way - with a lockout the players do not get paid. Please site the source. I read this morning all of the ESPN articles I could find and see nothing that indicates the players get paid. Then the agreement with the players ended - their contract with the owners goes into a suspended status. And no they do not get back pay when the new CBA is signed (unless negotiated in the agreement)

Jazz supporters should be praising the league for going for a hard cap. The Heat, Lakers, and Mavs buy championships much like the Yankees in the past in baseball. Lets support the hard cap so their is a level playing surface for all the NBA teams.

People I feel most sorry for are the little guys - ticket takers, ushers, concession stand people... they are the forgotten part of the lock-out equation. Up goes the unemployment rate (or second job opportunities)

OrlandoJazzFan
Winter Springs, FL

@Chewbacca - Fear of the unknown is why the owners want shorter rookie contracts. Rookies are unproven and as we have seen in the past - the college game does not always translate to the Pros (Jose Ortiz if you need an example. So the owners do not want to commit to these long guaranteed contracts on unproven commodities.

BU52
Provo, ut

With all the millionaire players waiting around, it wouldn't take much to start a new league. All those mega sports halls need to have something going on to fill them up. Not to mention the restaurants and other vendors relying on the games. Start another ABA where the players had fun and the fans will come storming back. When it becomes too much of a business it isn't much fun to watch.

UU32
Bountiful, UT

I love the NBA and the Jazz. However, I am completely and utterly fine with missing a season or two or even if professional basketball morphs into something different all together. College basketball is better anyway. I used to feel for Larry Miller, but Greg just doesn't do it for me - so no sympathy for the over the top wealthy owners. Spoiled, self centered, me-first players have ruined the game. The pinnacle of that for me was the Jerry Sloan, D-Will incidents of this last year, along with the "talents to South Beach" debacle. The NBA hit its peak in the 80s and 90s and the players now have no context and believe they are the ones that built the league. Look at the Jazz roster for next year -- who on that roster has really proven anything? Yet how many millions will the Miller's shell out to put a young, unproven product on the floor? The league needs discipline, contraction and less 19 year old millionaires.

Tennis Guy
Salt Lake City, UTAH

The NBA is a business and you can not stay in business if you are loosing money.I wish the players could see that. The players need to realize that they are way over paid now. Take the new deal and lets play some ball.

ouisc
Farmington, UT

I must admit--I am entirely on the owners side on this one. NBA players salaries are easily the largest chunk of gross revenue, yet the players take on zero risk. Zero. The players get stressed out if they don't show up to a practice, or maybe show up late. That's the extend of the players risk.

The owners, who are looking at the 40-43% of gross revenue, are contributing to player retirement funds, stadiums, team staff, physicians, coaches, advertising, media, etc., and still trying to hold onto a little profit for themselves. This is where the risk is....if the revenue is less than projected, this is what suffers, not the players. If the player signs a $1 billion deal and then gets hurt 10 days later, the team still pays the salary. The owners have all the risk. The players are pampered little millionaires.

Jazz Source
Alpine, UT

re: OrlandoJazzFan

Go to ESPN "CBA expires, NBA locks out its players" 4th paragraph from the bottom of the story.

I agree with you, that makes zero sense and I don't see how that can be accurate but it is still posted there just a few minutes ago as of this posting. I would post the link but the editorial police will like deny all my post but if you find that story on ESPN there right now it still says that.

It must be wrong. The players can't be getting paid...what would their motivation. I'm sure they would all be thrilled with a paid vacation for the next year.

Someone else asked if the Jazz were one of the teams losing money. Yes they were one of the teams losing money. I'm sure it was worse than normal too given the fact they were in the luxury tax when the injuries came last season, down economy, record tanked, and they had to unload Deron. I'm sure they lost plenty.

I hope the owners stick it to the players.

It seems like both sides are resigned to the fact that there is no chance to play until January-ish.

Anonymous Infinity
American Fork, UT

Since when do the inmates run the assylum? Players are entitled to any particular percentage of the basketball revenues? What are the basketball revenues? If these players want to share in the revenues, and want to "control" so much of the enterprise, then why cant' they also share in the losses? Huh, huh, huh. These leagues make me sick. Do it like the NFL or give it up. I hope the league takes a year off and then see what the players are up to. The owners can't give up on principles. However, the other thing is owners have to shape up as well. Take the Dodgers for an example; the owners are deialing with a divorce and live proligate lives, spending the teams funds on lavish living; running the team into the ground.I suspect some of that is going on with NBA owners. I can't stomach all these people doing what they are doing and then expect the fans and whoever is buying tickets to games, etc., to sit idily by and think all is well. Commissioner Stern and his staff also have to bear responsibility. How much are they being paid? Unbelievable.

joe5
South Jordan, UT

I've got to ask this question because I honestly don't know the answer. I can guess at a few answers but I don't really know:

With no CBA, could the NBA owners announce a player draft inviting anybody who wants to declare for the draft to do so? I suggest a 10-round draft with order selected by lottery and alternating rounds going in reverse order (the last pick in the first round gets first pick in the second round. Any players who are not drafted are free agents to sign with any team that wants them.

I know this will be D-league quality or worse. I can't imagine any current NBA players declaring for the draft but a lot of kids who've completed their college eligibility (Jackson Emery??) might declare. Americans playing overseas might opt to return home to play. And international players might also want to play in the NBA, even if it is watered down.

Any thoughts? Would anybody go to these games?

Weston Jurney
West Jordan, UT

To the greedy players and the greedy owners in BOTH leagues, Mercutio said it best:

"A plague on both your houses."

OrlandoJazzFan
Winter Springs, FL

Jazz Source

I don't think that ESPN reporter understood what he was talking about. Read NBA Lockout FAQ also on the ESPN site by Larry Coon. Some NBA players are paid in a a lump sum on July 1 and hence some have started missing checks now. It indicates that some are paid out over 12 months so will be receiving 2010-2011 checks up until December 1.

The article emphatically states " All players will miss their first paycheck no later than Nov. 15." - meaning for the current season.

This certainly makes more sense - Like you I was wondering what the incentive to negotiate was. Now those million dollar homes are at risk.

TJ
Eagle Mountain, UT

No NBA, no problem. More college ball will be on TV. Football isn't over until January so there will be plenty to watch for the first 3 months of no NBA. College ball is better anyway.

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