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Comments about ‘LDS scholar Richard Lyman Bushman talks ‘Mormon’ musical’

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Published: Sunday, Aug. 28 2011 11:00 a.m. MDT

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Ms Molli
Bountiful, Utah

ANOTHER article about this musical! Give it up! I realize that many members of the church like to feel victimized, but come on, enough is enough!

cymrul
West Valley City, UT

"THE BOOK OF MORMON" the longest running musical on the Deseret News comment board.

Eliot
Santaquin, UT

"Scholars dish on "Mormon" musical"? What does "dish on" mean? Do you mean "dis"? Are you trying to use slang for disrespect? If so, that's puzzling because the article quotes Richard Bushman who apparently doesn't have a problem with the musical and actually welcomes it as a way to get people talking about Mormonism.

Friend
West Valley City, UT

Bushman asks, "Wouldn't it be wonderful if through this funny and outrageous show we got to know one another better?"

Amen!

JM
Lehi, UT

Enjoyed the article, the inadvertent attention, and agree with "friend" and Bushman. Those seeking and fostering understanding across cultures, religions etc are the best of people....... : ) Not saying anything about those who don't....

Eddie T
Baton Rouge, LA

Name one doctrine stated in "I Believe" that is untrue.

christoph
Brigham City, UT

Bushman and Nibley seem to laugh at our culture as much as anyone----I always enjoy Bushman's kindness, warmth, wit and positive outlook----he is an amazing combination of talents. Elite people--including universities and media have ignored religion for a long long time---and now they are forced to deal with what they no longer can ignore. This didn't happen in a corner. And we aren't going away.

Denver
SANDY, UT

The question was asked to name "one doctrine" stated in "I Believe" which is untrue. Here are a few:
-The requirement of blind belief is not part of Mormonism. All are required to study, learn for themselves, pray and get answers; not to blindly accept or believe anything from anyone (including the Church's President).
-The idea that God "always has my back" is neither taught or believed.
-The idea that everyone "gets their own planet" is not taught nor believed. Indeed, Mormons hope, along with the meek, to inherit this earth; as Christ mentions in the Sermon on the Mount.
-The idea that God will always answer a sincere prayer. Joseph in Liberty Jail lamented God's silence. Believing in prayer is not the same as believing God will always answer.
-God does not live on a planet named Kolob. Kolob is referred to in Abraham 3: 9 as a gravitational star affecting time "nigh unto the throne of God" but is 1. Not a planet & 2. Not where God lives.
There are more, but this is a start. The blind believing is the most offensive.

LDS Revelations
Sandy, UT

@ Denver-
Your list includes things I was repeatedly taught and have by taught by LDS leaders for decades. Some are based on extrapolation and some are not explicit canon but instead implicit doctrine. They may not be taught now but some were at one time and have been discarded.

True, LDS are told to pray and find their own answers but are also told that if they get an answer that goes against the Church then they are wrong or deceived. IMO rejecting your own answers until you can finally accept what you are given by those in authority is exactly blind believing. Wouldn't you agree?

Many LDS substitute Kolob for a planet and the home of God. Why? Because it is the nearest place to God's home they know of and because of LDS teachings regarding eternal progression, God and the destiny of man. D&C 130 talks about God living on a great Urim and Thummim and also how in it's celestial state the earth will become one as well. Both feed into the teachings regardng God planets and Kolob.

Would you rather the song say "God lives on a giant clear seer stone planet"?

Jeff
Temple City, CA

@ LDS Revelations: My experience with doctrine and the song is the same as Denver. Personally, I find a great difference between "explicit canon" and "implicit doctrine." The former is reliable; the latter is not.

@ Eliot: "Dish" is an older slang term than "dis." "Dish" is short for "dish the dirt" (gossip) or "dish it out" (give information). In this context, it's a mild, informal way of saying he was giving information with the suggestion that he may be telling what was wrong with the musical.

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