Comments about ‘Divorce can lead to less support for college students’

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Published: Monday, June 6 2011 11:02 a.m. MDT

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no fit in SG
St.George, Utah

News Flash...........
MANY of us do and have gone to college without our parent's help.
It's called setting goals, hard work, and sometimes, education related loans. One works much harder as Mom and Dad are not paying for a failed class that you may have to take again. Students do better in college when they are paying their own way. They also end up with a great sense of accomplishment.
Fortunately, the parent's divorce does not lock up one's life!

Just Me
SLC, UT

Re: no fit in SG

thanks...just what I was thinking!!! This entitlement society starts at home. When people have asked me what I have done to "save" for my "kid's education." I tell them "I try to teach them to WORK hard at all they do, teach them the value of money, AND teach them an education is VITAL ( and that means ANY skill, not just 'book learning'). Many are flabbergasted that I wouldn't save a bunch of money for them to go to school.

Nan BW
ELder, CO

I paid for much of my college education myself, way back in the 60s. At that time it was possible to get a summer job that would pay most of the expenses for two semesters of college. That isn't the case now, and jobs are harder to land, especially summer jobs for young adults who won't be keeping the jobs past summer. I think students should be responsible for about one-half of college expenses, and if parents are able they should help fund about that much. My spouse and I helped our four with about that amount of their college costs, and I am glad they were able to start married life without student loans.

Furry1993
Somewhere in Utah, UT

To no fit in SG and Just Me

I also thought the same thing. I paid my way through college and graduate school all by myself. Parents do not authomatically owe their children a college education.

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