Comments about ‘America and the meaning of a Mormon president’

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Would Romney's election signal an end to anti-Mormonism?

Published: Friday, June 3 2011 11:00 a.m. MDT

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Wolfgang57
Salt Lake City, UT

While asking Americans to rise above religious bias, as was done when Catholic John Kennedy was elected President, it is doubtful that Mormons in government offices will themselves honor separation of church and state. In Utah, alcohol laws are dictated by Mormon belief because the majority of legislators are Mormon and do everything they can to restrict alcohol sales. Proof: If the legislature was made up of mostly Catholics or Buddhists, would the alchohol laws be the same? No way. The law gets as close to Mormon doctrine as it can. Mormon politicians, for the most part, vote whatever will make their religious leaders happy. If you want to elect people who honor separation of church and state, you don't elect Mormons. It's their official doctrine that they will take over the U.S. and they have no qualms about passing laws guided only by their religious beliefs

Gentile
brookings, SD

The headlines to this article are telling. That is why he won't get elected. Methodists, catholics, etc., would never ever like such a headline. But here it is ok. Too provincial, too ... well, Mormon.

Obama will win again.

johhen
Salt Lake City, UT

When I hear conservative commentators saying President Obama isn't a "real American" and all the other "birther" nonsense I question whether our country has really gone beyond racial prejudice.

CaliforniaCougar
Lake Elsinore, CA

Best of luck, Mitt. Looking at our economy and looking at your track record of turnaround, you are the right choice.

Cats
Somewhere in Time, UT

No one knows at this point whether Mitt can be elected or not. NO ONE! Obama is doing such a terrible job that even evangelicals might be willing to put their ignorance and prejudice aside and vote for a Mormon. No one knows what will happen. But, I think Mitt does have a real shot this time. It would show that America has really made a lot of progress.

liberal larry
salt lake City, utah

I don't know that there is a strong anti-mormon bias in this country, it's just that we don't tend to trust people who have beliefs that we don't understand, We also like to affiliate with people who have similar cultural backgrounds. You can see this in the overwhelming support among Republican Mormons for Mitt. I don't think they are anti-non-mormon, they just like someone like themselves.

Esquire
Springville, UT

A couple of thoughts. Trotting out black Mormons who support President Obama to add credibility to the argument of electing a Mormon president (who would have to defeat President Obama), takes a lot of gall by this newspaper. Will you stop at nothing? Second, if Mormons want mainstream acceptance, electing a Mormon Democrat as President would do more for that cause than electing someone like Romney who merely reinforces the stereotypes. Utah can't even elect a Democrat to the Senate and sends extreme conservatives to the Senate (when Hatch is too liberal for Utah, that's a perfect sign that Utah is out of the mainstream). Mormons want mainstream acceptance, yet they are firmly planted on the right extreme of of the political spectrum, based on their voting. Mormons as a whole don't even care much for Democrats in their midst. How will this ever lead to mainstream acceptance?

unaffiliated_person
Saratoga Springs, UT

CNN is running a front page poll on their website asking if America is ready for a Mormon president. As of this posting, 59% say no. Since when does religion or ethnicity matter in the candidate? Are we Americans becoming more prejudiced as time goes on? Imagine if JFK were not elected because he was Catholic and not Protestant like the majority of the US at the time.

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

I'd vote for Huntsman but never Romney.

@Cats; Obama is doing a much better job than his predecessor, and I sincerely doubt that buy-em and break-em-up and cut-the-staff Romney would do any better.

kirae
TRAVERSE CITY, MI

It takes almost a century to prepare a person for a time in history. With politics and the auto industry DNA in his blood, experience as a successful businessman, having advanced degrees in business and law from Harvard, being an articulate author and speaker, elected governor in one of the most liberal states in our nation, showing fidelity to his wife and family, serving our nation by saving the Olympics, serving honorably in many church callings including as a Stake President, Romney has been prepared for this time of economic crisis. We don't have time to raise up another with such credentials. Mormon or not, we can unite behind this most uniquely qualified canidate for President of the United States of America.

J-TX
Allen, TX

@ Wolfgang57 | 1:15 a.m. June 3, 2011

Ever think that Utah's Mormon legislators might vote through things the Mormons want NOT from pressure from the Church, but that those votes reflect the desires of their constituency - which is overwhelmingly LDS in the state?

Now I know SLC is not overwhelmingly LDS. But the state is. Somebody has a chip on their shoulder. Where's the salsa?

NedGrimley
Brigham City, UT

And the hand wringing continues......

Idaho Coug
Meridian, Idaho

I understand that many have a hard time with LDS beliefs. But all religious beliefs can seem strange and illogical to others in the same way. For example, millions are just fine with a Catholic candidate who believes the wafer and wine he takes on Sunday literally turns into the body and blood of Christ as he consumes it. No discarded logic there. But a Mormon candidate who believes Joseph Smith came up with new scripture from golden plates? No - that is just asking us to bend logic way too much!

It is just so interesting how humans can become absolutely comfortable with their own religious beliefs regardless the mental gymnastics required while finding other's so strange and unacceptable. LDS obviously do the same thing.

ClarkKent
Bountiful, Utah

"You'd be surprised," said Feldman, "by how many people pride themselves on having no prejudices at all but preserve a little place in their heart for this kind of soft anti-Mormon prejudice."

That is an interesting quote in the article. It probably comes as no surprise to many by how many mormons pride themselves on having no prejudice at all but perserve a little place in their heart for pro-mormon prejudice when it comes to election decisions.

I am active LDS, but I don't vote according to what church someone visits on Saturday or Sunday.

Dadof5sons
Montesano, WA

@ CaliforniaCougar,
your right on the money, no pun intended. It the economy and that is what Americans want is a turn around not another down turn. this Election is Mitts to lose.

KC Mormon
Edgerton, KS

RanchHand
Cut the staff is what this country needs right now. When you have at least 5 departments doing the same job you are wasting money. If we cutt alot of these government jobs and make them go back into the real world we will need less tax money to pay the ev er increasing government payrole. We can then let companies get back to what they are supposed mto do, create jobs from the private sectore not pay more and moe taxes for the government to make jobs that only cause us to go farther into debt.

whoisjohngalt
Holladay, UT

If he never talks about defending the United States Constitution I don't care if he's LDS. I'm LDS and I support Ron Paul!

metamoracoug
metamora, IL

J-TX: insightful, astute comment.

liberal larry: have you ever lived outside the state of Utah? In central IL, they still have anti-Mormon presentations at many local evangelical churches. A Lutheran minister told one of my children, "All Mormons are going to hell." One of the high school teachers, made the comment, "Mormons are like Nazis." With many similar experiences, I can verify that anti-Mormon feelings are alive and well in Illinois.

What is interesting to me is that this primary provides not one, but two potential Mormon presidential candidates.

FDRfan
Sugar City, ID

Being Mormon should not be a reason for voting against or for a candidate. Senator Smoot was a Mormon in high standing in the Church yet, if the economic historians are correct, the tariff bill he authored was unwise and the major cause of the Great Depression. However, being a Mormon should help assure that the candidate is honest, sincere and not willing to sell his soul for money. If Senator Smoot was indeed wrong, he certainly was not alone. Hopefully the nation learned from it. Senator Reid and Mitt Romney do not see eye to eye and how could that be expected of them. A good open-minded debate between them should be informative, however. The perception that the GOP stands for Gods Own Party is a mystery to me. A Mormon, by definition, means believing in the Book of Mormon and that Book, in my opinion, does not support that perception.

Pagan
Salt Lake City, UT

I thought a person's religion 'didn't matter.'

And now we have an article about what might happen if we had a Mormon president.

'Obama is doing such a terrible job that...' - Cats | 7:23 a.m. June 3, 2011

Reply facts:

*'Last U.S. combat brigade leaves Iraq' - By Rebecca Santana - AP - Published by DSNews - 08/19/10
'Seven years and five months after the U.S.-led invasion, the last American combat brigade was leaving Iraq, well ahead of President Barack Obama's Aug. 31 deadline for ending U.S. combat operations there.'

*'Deportation of illegal immigrants increases under Obama administration' - By Peter Slevin - 07/26/10 - Washington Post

*Instituted enforcements for equal pay for women (Lilly Ledbetter Bill) (2009)

*Appointed Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina, to the Supreme Court (2009)

*After organizing studies on the topic in 2009, tasked the Pentagon to eliminate Dont Ask, Dont Tell (2010)

*'Gadhafi asks Obama to stop' - By Matthew Lee - AP - Published by DSNews - 04/06/2011

*Bin Ladens death boosts Navy Seal museum in Fla By Matt Sedensky AP Published by DSNews 05/31/11

Good day.

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