Comments about ‘Provo Tabernacle remembered for its past ... and presence’

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Published: Friday, Dec. 17 2010 4:00 p.m. MST

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silas brill
Heber, UT

I wonder if the existing building was structurally tolerant for earthquakes. If it wasn't, this particular tragedy may have saved lives, that is, if there's ever an earthquake while people are inside.

I'm not LDS, so it's none of my business, but it would nice to see the tabernacle rebuilt to historical accuracy with the center tower. (I can't believe someone once wanted to tear it down for a shopping mall.)

Delta Man
Cedar Hills, UT

Provo Tabernacle couldn't have handled a minor earthquake. In 1983 there was a quake in Borah Peak Idaho. This 7.3 quake make a crack in the wall of a City Councilman's office in the SLC City County building, 200+ miles away. [Now retrofitted on shock absorbers for $45 Million] Tall unreinforced masonry buildings "URMs" catch the long low frequency waves and fail. Provo Academy Square / Library has a "new" building inside the old URM bricks. You should see the concrete reinforcing in the basement. Old mortar is just that, sand lime and mortar. Now they have "Spec Mix with Portland cement and lots of steel reinforcing. ReBar every 3 feet and horizontal wires. Masonry is a bad idea in a quake zone. Architects think like the '3 little pigs'. Straw and wood are bad. "Only brick is good." Even if a masonry building still stands the bricks are full of cracks and must be removed. Steel buildings are the way to go. New Deseret Towers Brick Y?
They might consider building something like the new Bountiful assembly building [on I-15.] They have a fair sized piece of land there.

Boom
Irving, TX

My favorite building in Provo was destroyed...that is horrible!

I sure hope that the LDS Church decides to rebuild the Tabernacle.

RGreen
Rexburg, ID

I'm so sad to hear this news. I feel just like an old friend has died. RIP (or better yet, be rebuilt!)

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