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Comments about ‘Humane Society choosy in finding homes for animals’

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Published: Thursday, Oct. 14 2010 1:00 a.m. MDT

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SME
Kearns, UT

Interesting that the Humane Society is able to put restrictions on pet adoptions yet adoption agencies have been sued for refusing to allow babies to be adopted into certain situations. What a world.

Evets
Eagle Mountain, UT

I can understand the right to refuse IF the reason was suspicion of high potential abuse BUT this case is uncalled for. This is a case of an quasi-government institution having too high of an opinion of itself. All my pets for decades have come from shelters and fortunately I have never been refused an adoption request but if I did ever get a refusal I would fight it with everything I have. Sometime employees, managers, and even voluteers have too high of an opinion of themselves. Often times government and quasi-government agencies think they know what is best for society when they really have just lost sight of their mission.

Corn Dog
New York, NY

More good reasons to get your pet from a pet shop or a breeder.

Rynn
Las Vegas, NV

No it's not more good reason to get animals from a pet shop or breeder.

Cat
Centerville, UT

There's always the county animal shelters. When we were looking for a dog to adopt we found the Humane Society a bit harsh for adopting animals. We went to the Salt Lake County Animal Shelter and were treated very nicely by everyone there. We have had that puppy for 14 years. I'd go there again to get another animal.

cla
Salt Lake City, UT

I'm Carl Arky, Director of Communications for the Humane Society of Utah. If anyone wishes to contact me about this case they can at 506-2416. I doubt anyone will. It's much easier to judge from afar rather than volunteer to be a foster pet parent or to come to the shelter and take care of the animals. Just for the record, HSU adopted out nearly 8,000 animals in 2009 and we are ahead of that pace this year. That's 4 times as many as a similar shelter in San Diego, twice as many as San Francisco. Part of our success is due to the selfless foster care families who help us save so many animals. Had a foster family not nurtured the kitten in this case, it may not have survived long up to ever be put up for adoption. It was placed in another home. And the woman in this case was offered the chance to adopt one of our "outdoor cats." I invite more people to come volunteer, foster, and find out what goes on. Then you can reach an informed judgement. FYI, when someone buys an animal, another one dies.

Sabrecat
South Jordan, UT

When someone buys an animal another one dies ? Are you kidding me ?

So... since I decided to get a dog from a breeder, non-papered, another dog was killed....

I call Bull-feathers.

Built2Last
Provo, UT

It could be worse. The foster family could have required the adoptive owners to provide daily pedicures, hot stone massages, poached salmon thrice daily, and a kitty Wii with a 52" flat screen TV. Then what?

  • 5:07 p.m. Oct. 14, 2010
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ShaunWhite
SLC, UT

Hey Carl, let me break it down…
“If anyone wishes to contact me about this case they can at 506-2416. I doubt anyone will.”

I don’t know what that means. Why did you give your number out if you don’t think anyone will contact you?

“Just for the record, HSU adopted out nearly 8,000 animals in 2009 and we are ahead of that pace this year. That's 4 times as many as a similar shelter in San Diego, twice as many as San Francisco.”

What does that have anything to do with the story? Does that mean that if you adopt out 16,000 animals in 2010, you can treat people twice as badly when they attempt to adopt a, soon to be, euthanized kitty at the Humane Society?

ShaunWhite
SLC, UT

“And the woman in this case was offered the chance to adopt one of our "outdoor cats."”

I’m confused, everything I’ve seen on the news and read in the story talk about how the West Jordan woman was treated, yet you keep talking about statistics and policies. I think you are missing the point!

This is what the West Jordan woman said, "She said (the Humane Society worker), nope, you can't have the cat, he could get run over, naming all these horrible things, making me feel like I'm a bad cat owner. It kind of put a sour taste in my mouth, wanting to do a good deed and then having my hand slapped because I let my cat outside.”

ShaunWhite1
Park City, Ut

This is the point and I hope you pay attention! It’s not so much about the process or the policy as it is how everyone treated the woman. Your staff said things to her to make her feel like a bad cat owner and objurgated her for the way she was raising her, already owned, cat. The article said “she left in tears.” Wasn’t this on her birthday? What a birthday gift, to hear some peon tell you how horrible of a person you are. Is this the way the Humane Society treats people? I can’t imagine how it treats the animals in there? Maybe the Humane Society should be investigated for cruelty to animals?

I’m curious; did you even call that West Jordan woman to apologize to her for the way she was treated? You said in the article, "We're always sad and sorry if someone comes away with feeling like they had a bad experience. That's not what we want to have happen.” So what did you do to rectify the situation? Did you call her? Did you give her the option to adopt another kitten at no cost?

ShaunWhite2
Sandy, UT

What did the Humane Society do to put a good taste in the mouth of that West Jordan woman? You didn’t say anything in the article about doing something, so I am willing to bet you did nothing. Am I right?

You said in the article, "We want to do adoptions but we want to make sure they go to the home that is the right fit for them."

Can you be more specific? What does that mean, “right fit?” Why wouldn’t a homeless kitten needing a home be the “right fit” for a woman who takes really good care of her, already owned, cat? The news story said that her neighbors thought that her cat was the most spoiled cat in her neighborhood. Is your statement implying that owners who spoil their cats aren’t good people to adopt kitten to? I don’t understand, maybe you can “logically” or “statistically” explain your reasoning to me? It appears as though that is how you justify the way you treat people.

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