Comments about ‘Sustainable eating — Simple steps for getting healthier and greening the planet’

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Published: Sunday, Oct. 3 2010 3:46 p.m. MDT

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rvalens2
Burley, ID

Greening the planet, carbon footprint?

Eeh gads! More AGENDA driven articles in the Deseret News.

Make mine a medium rare T-bone steak with buttered mushrooms, fries on the side and a JUMBO Coke to top it off.

If I'm gonna die at 50, I want to go out happy and content.

My2Cents
Kearns, UT

It doesn't make any sense what eating meat and going green have to do with the planets environment. Unless he means that the foliage of plants is green. Even plants have to have fertilizer and that comes from animals so they have a long standing relationship to each other where one helps the other. Cows eat plants, cows nourish plants.

It's not so much a dietary problem with Americans health. Its what adulterations our food supply goes through from genetic manufacture of seed, to growing, to processing, to preparation for storage, and preparing for consumption that have made Americans unhealthy. No where else in the world is food so adulterated and unhealthy as it is right here in the US. We may be able to grow and stuff ones belly with more food than any other nation, but it takes tons more food the get the nutrients from food that our bodies need. The inedible adulterated parts of out dietary intake goes to fat and obesity.

Even farm fresh has little food that hasn't been adulterated as seed and hormones to propel growth beyond reasonable animal endurance's. Want healthy eating? Check the food supply first.

Meg
Portage, MI

This is an excellent article. Early this year, I decided to take personal responsibility for my own health, and I started eating in a way that would support good health. I don't know how long I'll live, but I know I will feel better every day, have more energy for the things I want to do in my life, and be less of a burden to our struggling health-care system.

It's time to start acting like adults, not self-indulgent children. We know what we ought to do to take care of our bodies and our world. It just takes some commitment and responsibility.

Meg
Portage, MI

Excellent article. I agree that eating wisely has both immediate and long-term rewards, for ourselves and our community. We feel better every day, have more energy, and are less of a burden to the health-care system. It may seem satisfying in the short term to eat whatever sounds good, but we don't let our children do that because we know it will hurt them. We need to give our own bodies the chance to be healthy.

Demisana
South Jordan, UT

@My2Cents - the article should have explained the connection between eating less meat and being green. Most meat today is raised on grain, instead of grass fed. Reason being it's quicker and fattier, making it more profitable and tastier/more marketable. It takes something like 32 lbs of grains to produce 1 lb. of meat. It takes far more water to produce meat, than to produce grain. So it is much more efficient to grow and eat produce, than to raise and eat meat.

Dawson
Perris, CA

Ya know I tend to lean to the side of Meg..... I am as healthy as a horse and have always been. I eat moderately, and exercise and keep very active. The problem is, you have to have protien and sugar for energy. And another thing, you need to get off the couch and work off what you eat. Simple. And there is an over abundance of wheat grown by our farmers right now and the same with corn. Why not find other uses for it instead of stopping the production. The farmers need the support and our country is very inventive. I am 62 years old, and still working as a physical therapist. I give blood every 3 months. They call me if I don't show up, cause they need my blood type. Must be something to just living a moderate life with lots of activity. I think we all worry too much about this stuff. It usually ends up they come out 5 -10 years later with a new study and find out they were wrong anyway.

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