Comments about ‘Local schools fighting childhood obesity’

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Published: Friday, Sept. 24 2010 9:57 p.m. MDT

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Clarissa
Layton, UT

It would be nice to have more time for physical activities, but one problem is where do you do it? In California, we could pretty much go outside year-round, but here in Utah, where do you do activities when the playground is covered in snow or when it is freezing outside? Many schools do have activity rooms in addition to the multi-purpose room, but even than you don't have enough time for each class to use these areas daily for 30 or 40 minutes. Serious money will need to be spent to build buildings where exercise can be done. Are the people of Utah willing to do it? By the way, I stopped giving out treats even before we started the Gold Medal program at our school, but the rewards cost me considerable more money than just buying soda pop. Fortunately, I was able to afford it.

markbirdsall
Taylorsville, UT

It is so great that schools are supporting children in reducing obesity! I was very surprised to read recently that the cost of treating medical conditions related to obesity exceeds the cost of treating medical conditions related to smoking and problem drinking combined.

My2Cents
Kearns, UT

Schools are violating health care laws and should stop this. This obesity means they are overeating and fed too much so stop free school feeding frenzy programs.

Let the parents be responsible for childrens health care and nutritional needs. The excuse that children are hungry is phony and misleading so parents don't have to buy food or feed their own children.

Schools are not the place for practicing health care, they are to educate not worry about child obesity. They are obese because schools are feeding them too much, just as cattle are fed before the slaughter. Hunger is good for the soul and the body, its time to practice some common sense attitudes in education.

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