U.S. one of few countries to execute inmates


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  • LDS Liberal
    June 19, 2010 8:28 a.m.

    androol | 6:11 p.m. June 17, 2010
    China, Saudi Arabia, Iran, North Korea, Pakistan, Sudan, USA. How proud we must feel...


    This a is a sad, sad thing!!!

  • OlpuebloguyInWyo
    June 18, 2010 7:10 p.m.

    The death penalty is a deterant to capital crimes, but is shrinking with the lengthy appeals process.

    1. There should be a maximum amount of time allowed before a capital case goes to trial.

    2. There should be 2 appeals maximum and a maximum amount of time allowed to get through those.

    3. Overall, there should be a maximum amount of time beofre the execution takes place, once the appeals are made and done.

    4. Every state should have specific judges who only hear these cases.

    Only by doing this will the constitution be followed.

  • Travis Burnswell
    June 18, 2010 6:42 p.m.

    Lightning is a terrible analogy and comparing the US to Mexico is laughable. I keep trying to come up with a comparable comparison but every time I do it "violates one of our rules."

  • Travis Burnswell
    June 18, 2010 6:41 p.m.

    Lightning is a terrible analogy and comparing the US to Mexico is just ridiculous. I'll compare apples to cow dung and come up with some misleading statistics too. Maybe even a chart.

  • higv
    June 18, 2010 7:31 a.m.

    Wisconsin does not have a death penalty and Jeffrey Dahmer a serial killer murdered many people there. He died in prison because the guy in there had nothing to lose by killing him. The wicked punish the wicked. It should bUsed more. If it is less innocent people would be killed. And struck by lightning is a bad analogy since getting struck by lightning can happen by being at the wrong place at the wrong time. You have to be found guilty of murder to get the death penalty.

  • Aker
    June 18, 2010 6:20 a.m.

    @the truth - Still, those other "civilized" places have lower rates of violent crime (and recidivism). Your death penalty doesn’t seem to be working as a deterrent. It costs more to execute someone than it does to keep someone incarcerated as well. Perhaps you’d be the kind of person who says society should just do away with all that ‘due process’ or ‘fair trial’ mumbo-jumbo and just go straight to the sentencing. I mean, that kind of justice system worked so well for the Taliban I see no reason you’d want the USA to be any different.

    I wonder if you were one of the people who defended Saddam Hussein’s justice system. He didn’t have an appeals process either.

    As others have noted, the USA is in good company considering who else still permits the death penalty.

  • the truth
    June 17, 2010 7:10 p.m.

    RE: androol | 6:11 p.m.

    Yeah we are proud,

    that taking a life of the innocent means something here,

    that he victim life has value,

    that justice si meted out as equal to the horrible crime as humanly possibly,

    while other so-called "civilized" places taking a life is just another crime and therefore lacks in weight of its severity.

    if it is all about money there are many ways in which we can save maney in trying and punishing criminals,

    from more thorough original trials, to corporal punsishment, to hastening exuction.

    but making the general public "pay" crime for the life sentence should not be one of them.

  • androol
    June 17, 2010 6:11 p.m.

    China, Saudi Arabia, Iran, North Korea, Pakistan, Sudan, USA. How proud we must feel...

  • Gregory Johnson
    June 17, 2010 5:41 p.m.

    Personally like the death penalty, if you are such a menace to society that you have to be seperated from them forever you should be off the planet particularly with 6 billion plus on this earth.

  • stophittingyourself
    June 17, 2010 5:38 p.m.

    Yes, Ben, a long death penalty (on the taxpayers' dime). Some of these people need a chance to reform and change their lives as much as is possible, but two murders at two different times and another attempted murder in jail--this guy is a poster child for the penalty.

  • procuradorfiscal
    June 17, 2010 3:52 p.m.

    What a specious argument! Since some who deserve the death penalty don't get it, no one who deserves the death penalty should?

    What's next? Since not everyone who speeds gets a speeding ticket, no one should? Since not everyone who digs up pots on federal lands or reservations goes to jail, no one should?

    Where does it end? Since not everyone who murders is convicted, no one should be convicted of murder?


    Not only that, the true-believing anti-death-penalty die-hards making this specious argument are the very same activists that make executing the truly deserving such an expensive, drawn-out, hit-or-miss proposition in the first place.

    There is not the slightest doubt that Ronnie Lee Gardner richly deserves the death penalty. And has for 25 years. That someone else who also richly deserves to die for his crimes doesn't, is no reason to reward Gardner.

  • Ben Lopshire
    June 17, 2010 3:44 p.m.

    First of all: Thanks Josh, I am going to be thinking this one over for awhile. This makes me truly consider if the death penalty is needed, at the same time though, isn't a life sentence a really long death penalty?

  • Chris B
    June 17, 2010 1:55 p.m.

    We should be using it a lot more

  • jplant
    June 17, 2010 1:53 p.m.

    China, India, Iran and Iraq. These are the countries whose human rights we mimic when we have the death penalty.

  • lsteinbentley
    June 17, 2010 1:37 p.m.

    Gardner should have been executed years ago. He showed no respect for human lives when he was young and that has not changed. (He stabbed another inmate and could have killed him, too.) Some people will never change and are to dangerous to leave even in prison. In certain situations the death penalty is warranted.
    Without the death penalty some criminals will literally have nothing to lose because going to prison is like going home for them. Some criminals do not mind prison, that should be evident to the rest of us considering how many re-offenders there are.