Comments about ‘Utah Legislature: Many bills aimed to financially help Jordan District’

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Published: Friday, March 12 2010 12:00 a.m. MST

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Finally!

A small win for the little guys.

Great News!

This is great news about the passing of HB 295! Let's hope that the Jordan School Board will now be wise with its new flexibility. Let's hope they'll combine this access to newly usable money with a moderate tax increase and maybe a small amount of furloughs. If they do this, almost all layoffs could be avoided. If any layoffs remain to be made, they should be done at the administrative level. Many have rallied (legislators, teachers, students, parents, and community members) to help the Jordan School Board to be able to change their announced budget plan. Here's hoping they will be willing to change their plan and become allies with those who have rallied so hard in their behalf.

@Finally

I don't see how this is only a little help, nor is Jordan little as it is the 4th largest district in the state. HB295 was conceived for Grand District but if it will help Jordan a bit too, that's great.
Newbold needs to quit overstating others' minor roles (I.E. Canyons creation) for the major problems his administration has created for both the current & former Jordan School District.
Alpine & Davie both have more students and less money per student than Jordan, yet they choose to do what they must with what they have rather than create a woe-is-me PR blitz.
Good luck Jordan - do what yiu must with what you have - just like everyone else.

Anonymous

I'm sorry that the Jordan district is suffering financially, but the split is something that they thought just had to happen. Other districts are suffering also and I don't see any offers being made to them.

Utah Dem

Although the Jordan District ought to send Kevin Garn a thank you note - at least he got them off the front page of every newspaper in the top half of the state.

Provo School District

could be four to five million dollars short. While that is not 30 million like Jordan with five secondary schools (two high school, two middle and one alternative) and about a dozen or so elementaries this is quite significant. I doubt Jordan will be the only district that faces these type of challenges. Now that the money has been allocated from the state, combine that with local property sales tax revenue losses (as compared to even last year and certainly big shortfalls compared to previous years), even rougher times are ahead. Plus 11,000 new students will be flooding our schools with less funding and less teachers. The economy needs to recover or things will get ugly. Utah has kept its high test scores despite lagging in per pupil spending but as the state faces great challenges with more socio-economic diversity, good teachers and generally involved parents will not make up for a lack of a funding and huge class sizes.

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