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The poorest areas in Utah by ZIP code

Published: Friday, June 29 2012 8:46 a.m. MDT

#50 - Salt Lake City - 84165 Next » 1 of 50 « Prev
Photo Dean via Flickr
Population: 23,238

Adjusted Gross Income: $40,700.48

Salary Per Return: $29,770.53

Taxes Paid: $1,495.17

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pburt
Logan, UT

Editors--I hate having to load 50 separate pages to see a list, or even to just get to the top of the list. Very user-unfriendly. If you have a list, give the whole list, with links to expand each item as desired. This is one reason I spend so much more time at SLTrib than here at DesNews.

dumprake
Washington, UT

and how many times was Salt Lake City listed? about half. So I'm lost on what this list actually means. Cmon.

y19guy
salt lake city, UT

Well, in a nutshell the zipcode 84112 is the poorest zipcode in Utah, and guess what, it is around the University of Utah. Probably the per capita income is low because of students that have little or no income. The neighborhood is upscale. Just shows these kinds of statistics don't mean anything.

JSB
Sugar City, ID

I'd like to see a graphic of all the zip codes in Salt Lake Valley. Also,pbrt's suggestion is a good one.

TheOfficalCall
Spanish Fork, UT

This is a list that can be very skewed. Just like y19guy stated about The U of U, the same is and can be said about 84606 where I live, also Provo 84601. The zipcode includes a VERY large portion of the BYU students. It also includes many areas where the average return could be 100K+.

desplin
Saint George, UT

I agree with pburt. It is a big pain to load lists 1 at a time. You need to make the full list available.

River Dog
Salt Lake City, UT

I agree with pburt. Your survey is a waste of the reader's time. The ten top zip codes would be more beneficial. In the end, who really cares, excpet for politicians who want to know where to campaign for $$$

Serenity
Manti, UT

Well not exactly a waste of time. The pictures were pretty. I don't understand the purpose of this article though. I can't believe that so many people between 19 and 64 don't have health insurance. Let's not panic people before we have the facts of Obamacare. Right now what will happen is a deep dark mystery. Hopefully, this all will change in November.

Me
Huntington Beach, CA

I'm sure that places like Meadow and Kanosh are should be on this list since they are small farming communities with little places to work. Get reeal What did you do just pull places out of a hat and Salt Lake and Provo made the list quite a bit more than towns in Utah that should have actually been on the list.

DrGroovey
Salt Lake City, UT

Zip codes 84165 and 84170 are post offices. They have PO boxes but no residential delivery. How can they be considered as amongst the poorest zip codes in Utah when they are only a set of boxes hanging on a wall? Or could it be the Des News didn't thnk about checking on such things?

gdog3finally
West Jordan, Utah

Our healthcare is broken and will never get fixed. The business of capitalist medicine has to much greed and corruption behind it to be remedied. We all have to play the game to protect our families.

Oh My Heck!
Vernal, UT

Zipcodes are meaningless unless there is some further information about WHERE they are. Just saying Salt Lake City, or Ogden is not very helpful. The 84606 zip in Provo is the are where lots of BYU students live, including my son. They have very little income, usually. He has the BYU health insurance, and I think at least undergraduates are required to have it unless they can show they have other insurance. Many areas in the Uintah Basin could be on this list, too.

SLC gal
Salt Lake City, UT

Wow. I live in #7. Considering that zip code is underdevleoped commercially, beyond the point of a joke, and many of the tows on these lists are dominantly rural (I was supried to see Beaver on here. It's only a gas staion and hotel, there's nothing else!), there coulnd't be a link between economic devlopment and income levels, could there? Such a no brainer.

utahboni
Ogden, UT

There is a point that this article didn't take into consideration when they were adding up the income of college towns. College students will still be able to be carried on their parent's policies until they are 26. So, you need to subtract the college towns from your equation. Even though their wages may be low, their parent's are picking up the tab.

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