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The 20 happiest jobs in America for 2014

#19 - IT Consultant Next » 2 of 20 « Prev
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Bliss Score: 3.83
Average Salary: $77,500
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The Rock
Federal Way, WA

Many of the job titles are so generic it tells you nothing.

Just what is a designer?
I am an equipment engineer and I design equipment.
My wife designs dresses.
I have a daughter who wants to be an interior designer.
There there is the TV show: Designing Women.

Words, words just words. Let's have some definition.

Samwise
Eagle Mountain, UT

The Rock is right. Other examples: Team Leader? Isn't it possible to be a "team leader" in nearly any profession? General Manager? Also how did intern and research/teaching assistant get on here. Even if they are happy jobs, they are temporary jobs. No one is an intern or a research/teaching assistant forever. Strange list.

Dr. Thom
Long Beach, CA

Research asistant is also generic since 75% of all college teaching posiions are held by part-time adjuncts that would like to be funntime reserachers. But with a 1 in 4 chance, the odds mean that if you dont start down that career path when you are a freshman in college, your chance of gaining a coveted reserach position at a top tier reserach university is pretty slim

BYU Joe
MISSION VIEJO, CA

I would have thought being King would be number one.

Gael Ridire
Farmington, UT

Research/Teaching Asst. is the #1 job, it pays an average 34K a year, survival wages. In fact many of these jobs are very low on the pay scale besides generic description.

Oatmeal
Woods Cross, UT

This list is so generic it has absolutely no meaning. There is no context.

iron&clay
RIVERTON, UT

I have noticed women employed in a job where they are briskly walking around their neighborhoods pushing baby buggies and having cheerful, happy conversations with their colleagues.

Oh, I remember what that happiest of all jobs is called.... motherhood.

Funny I didn't see it on your list.

Stormwalker
Cleveland , OH

I vote with the others in comments. I was looking for actual jobs, not random and generic job titles. "General Manager" of a factory? Of a Walmart? Of a movie theater?

Team Leader? Where and doing what? Target calls their employees teams and "Team Lead" is tacked on every position description. I was a "Team Lead" at an insurance company call center. I have a friend who leads a software team. All are different and have different meanings.

Plus, you missed "Making random lists to publish" as a job that must be all warm and fuzzy and full of happy joy! (It is a job I want to get! I know I would be happy.)

Max
Charlotte, NC

Intern and Teaching Assistant aren't real jobs. They are temporary positions on the road (hopefully) to a job.

soccer coach
Taylorsville, UT

What about professional athlete? I would love to be paid millions of dollars playing a sport I love. I also agree with the motherhood job and please include fatherhood. I love the hours that I have with my daughters.

Gene Poole
SLC, UT

(inserts tongue in cheek) Based upon this list, true laborious Bliss is not related to income. So, it must be related to job satisfaction (he supposes in a generically analytical way). The Bliss of being a real estate agent is intriguing. I have often looked at Real Estate agents nigh unto used car or insurance sales men and women. Selling blissful dirt with bricks rather than financial "security" to a family (remember someone has to die to make all that bliss come true) or the adventure of constant wonder as to what the used car seller forgot to tell you about, oh say, the transmission at 60 MPH or other fun and blissful things. It's all just Pure Bliss! Well, maybe for the salesperson - after the commissions are paid.

My take is that it is the in-duh-vidual that makes the job a drudgery or bliss, day in and day out. My biggest question is what are the 5 on the richter bliss scale jobs? Maybe they are the pro sports jobs. And Doctors and Lawyers. (takes tongue out of cheek!)

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