BYU basketball report card: Prairie View A&M brings out the best in BYU

Published: Thursday, Dec. 12 2013 12:02 p.m. MST

Matt Gade, Deseret News

PROVO — Well, that settles it. BYU is the greatest team of all-time.

Or, maybe the Cougars just looked that way in their 100-52 win over the Prairie View A&M Panthers Wednesday night at the Marriott Center.

One of the only real question after this game is how in the world did Texas A&M only beat the Panthers by 10 earlier this season?

Prairie View A&M was picked to finish ninth in the 10-team Southwestern Athletic Conference by SportsNetwork.com. This does not bode well for Alabama State, the only team picked behind the Panthers.

Prairie View A&M trivia buffs remember that Mr. T attended Prairie View on a football scholarship, although he was expelled after just one year. Former NFL safety Ken Houston, a 12-time Pro Bowler and member of the NFL Hall of Fame, graduated from the school after it gave him his only scholarship offer out of high school. So did Rock & Roll Hall-of-Famer Charles Brown.

None of that helped Prairie View's men’s basketball team, however, as the Panthers lost to the Cougars by 48 points.

BYU outshot the Panthers 61 percent to 29 percent, made six more 3-pointers on 13 less attempts, and dominated in rebounds, assists, steals, blocks, turnovers and fouls committed.

On the bright side, Prairie View A&M outshot BYU from the foul line, 71 percent to 69 percent.

On an even brighter side, BYU didn’t play zone defense.

Here are the grades for each BYU position group and other aspects of the game.

Nate Gagon is a published sports, music, and creative writer. He is also a whole-hearted father, grateful husband and ardent student of life. He can be reached at: nategagon@hotmail.com or @nategagon.

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trueblueBYU
Provo, UT

Saturday night should be interesting. Utah will get the chance to show that their record is not a fluke. We shall see. I'm thinking it is!

WisCoug
VERONA, WI

I 100% agree with your assessment of Coach Rose's personnel decisions. Winder has shown great ability, but he needs to be getting steady minutes if he is going to be a factor come conference (and possibly NCAA) tournament time. I also think that in addition to how Worthington was used it is equally surprising how few minutes this year have gone Josh Sharp's way. Still, even with these head-scratchers a C- is probably a bit harsh.

That would have to assume that more than 25% of the coach's grade comes from how effectively he works in his bench during games decided early and that he got exactly 0 of those possible points. BYU's defense was excellent, their best players stayed out of foul trouble, Carlino played within himself for the most part (no terrible shots and definitely more than 7 good passes despite ending up with 7 assists), and the team shot a few percentage points better than their season average. All things that indicate he is doing his job well and that a B or a B- at worst would be more appropriate (just my two cents).

idablu
Idaho Falls, ID

I, too, was bewildered by Rose not giving his bench more quality minutes, especially Sharp. The game was well in hand by the first half and putting the subs in early in the 2nd half would go a long way to improving your depth without risking the game at all. With the way the games are being officiated this year, Rose will be turning to his bench much more frequently. Why not give them as much playing time as opportunity presents.

If I were the opposing coach I would be kind of ticked Rose was so slow to play his bench….

Vladhagen
Salt Lake City, UT

I do think that something needs to be said for getting some of the starter experience. Mika is a true freshman, Collinsworth is just back from a mission. These guys are starters. They also used the minutes well. They were improved by them. It is a silly argument to say that Rose should have given more minutes to his bench. You cannot have the cake and eat it too.

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