Quantcast

Unforgettable moments in American history

Published: Sunday, Dec. 1 2013 10:57 p.m. MST

Associated Press

Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013, will mark the 72nd anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, which occurred on Dec. 7, 1941 — "a date which will live in infamy" as President Franklin Roosevelt so memorably declared.

Most Americans who were alive on the day Pearl Harbor was bombed remember exactly where they were when they first heard the news.

This event changed the course of the country, and the course of individual lives.

The U.S. has several unforgettable moments that caused course changes for us as a country and made each of us take a moment and reflect on life.

None of these moments is perhaps as impactful as the bombing of Pearl Harbor, but all had major impact on us as a nation.

For those alive during each of these events, most will remember exactly where they were when they heard about the event.

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
Anti Bush-Obama
Chihiuahua, 00

I was in Heaven at the time but unlike what the article says, I have no recollection of having been there.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Darn -- I was eleven months old on December 7, 1941 so I don't remember that. Don't really remember VE or VJ Days, but I do remember my uncle, who was an air raid warden, coming to our house wearing his helmet to tell us we had some light showing during a blackout.

But I do remember all the others. Gee whiz, I must be growing old!

CougarBlue
Heber City, UT

Oh, yes I remember where I was. I was being blessed in Church that day. Well, at least I was told that was where I was.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

Moon walk I do remember. I was 10 and watching Walter Cronkite on our black n white console TV in the basement. I remember the shadowy images bouncing round on the moon and then going outside and looking up at the moon and being amazed ...along with my older brother ...that men were on the moon right at that moment. Pretty amazing...pretty cool!!

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments