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10 worst countries for child labour

Published: Wednesday, Oct. 16 2013 12:02 a.m. MDT

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Consistently ranked as one of the worst nations across almost all spectrums of civil liberties and human rights, it should come as no surprise that the poverty stricken nation with it's general lack stability tops the list.

Child labour is even enforced by the Eritrean government, which enforces the policy of Mahtot, wherein children are required to work at least 2 months out of the year in-between school.
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The Final Word
Alpine, UT

I was born and raised in Canada and I lived on a farm from the time I was 8. I worked my butt off. In the spring, summer, and fall I often worked 10-12 hour days in the fields with crops during summer vacation and weekends.

In the winter I got up hours earlier than school started and fed livestock only to return home after school and do more of the same.

Alot of our kids and many in society would be alot better off if they had the opportunity to experience hard physical labor.

I am better off for it and now evidently it is a crime?

Clearly there are some other factors at work in many of these countries but hard work in and of itself is hardly a crime....not to mention it is the only way for many of these people to feed themselves and yet we have do-gooder liberals trying to prevent it.

Of course slave-like child labor is an entirely different circumstance than what I am referring to. Some of these kids don't mind working if they help provide. If there is true criminality involved then that has to stop.

apm22
sparks, NV

“From the time he could walk, ‘T.’, as young Ezra was nicknamed, was his father’s shadow—riding horses, working in the fields, hitching up the horse and buggy for meetings, playing ball and swimming in the creek. He had a rich sense of heritage, stemming from his birthright as Ezra T. Benson’s eldest great-grandson, but also because he idolized his father and, as a young boy, felt an unusual sense of security and deep pride in who he was. Years later, after George Benson died, his eldest son overheard one of the few non-Mormons in Whitney say, ‘Today we buried the greatest influence for good in Cache Valley.’ Without question, George Benson was a powerful influence in the life of his eldest son” (Sheri L. Dew, Ezra Taft Benson: A Biography [1987], 14).

Truthseeker
SLO, CA

re:TheFinalWord
"Of course slave-like child labor is an entirely different circumstance than what I am referring to."

Did you attend school? Or, did you just work 10-12 hrs/day in unsafe conditions without any hope of going to school--ever?

Did you leave home (forever) as a child to work for someone else 12 hrs/day?

Did you have a warm place to sleep and adequate food to eat?

I agree, requiring our children to do age-appropriate work is an important part of helping them to develop a good work ethic.

But we know this is not what is happening to children in these countries.

DVD
Taylorsville, 00

@Truthseeker

"re:TheFinalWord
"Of course slave-like child labor is an entirely different circumstance than what I am referring to."

Did you attend school? Or, did you just work 10-12 hrs/day in unsafe conditions without any hope of going to school--ever?

Did you leave home (forever) as a child to work for someone else 12 hrs/day?

Did you have a warm place to sleep and adequate food to eat?

I agree, requiring our children to do age-appropriate work is an important part of helping them to develop a good work ethic.

But we know this is not what is happening to children in these countries."

Bears repeating. What's described here is the destruction of children, not helping them to improve. Bangladesh, India and to some extent, China are doing the same. Some there may feel that school isn't needed for children that are worked in conditions hazardous enough to kill them before many become adults, if they even think of their welfare at all.

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