Constitution Day quiz: What do you know about the U.S. Constitution?

Published: Monday, Sept. 16 2013 10:55 p.m. MDT

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On this Constitution Day, test your knowledge of the people, places and events surrounding the writing and ratification of the United States Constitution.
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anneray
Kosciusko, Mississippi

The question: What is Article 2 of the Constitution? The answer given to this question is confusing to say the least. Please let me know what the correct answer should be. Thank you.

I know it. I Live it. I Love it.
Salt Lake City, UT

What do we know about the constitution?

That gay marriage isn't in it.
That marriage of any form isn't in it.
That the right to privacy about your body (which somehow magically justifies abortion) isn't in it.

The only thing that is, is equal protection of the laws. Well all men equally can marry a woman and all woman can equally marry a man. The law already applies to us equally. Therefore our vote ought not be invalidated by 9 people with too much power. (FYI, that "power" isn't even in the constitution either... look up Judicial Review and try again)

Our constitution already hangs by just a few threads, if that.

Ultra Bob
Cottonwood Heights, UT

A very large part of the problems of our education system is the notion that we need to cram so much useless and irrelevant information into a person’s head.

Rather than expect people to pledge their lives to support the Constitution just because the political stars of 200 years ago proposed it, we should have the information and knowledge about why it was created, and what were the interests and motives of the people who created it. And to reach some consensus about what the words mean.

MacNasty
Rexburg, ID

Interesting, informative and fun.

I do want to make one point. To the question "All of the framers of the constitution were born in the United States-true or false" the answer indeed is false.

However, technically, none of the framers were born in the United States since the United States did not exist when they were born.

Picky I know, but that is why I am MacNasty.

Pac_Man
Pittsburgh, PA

@Ultra Bob
I agree with you 100%. How the Constitution was put together and the fact that it has lasted in terms of securing our freedoms from tyranny is something short of a marvel and wonder. This is lost on kids today let alone a good majority of this country.

It is sad that Sept 17th isn't given more recognition. It should be a National Holiday if not a School or even a Banking Holiday. It is the birth of this nation. It was on this day that the country was actually created and not July 4, 1776.

Oatmeal
Woods Cross, UT

"I know it. I Live it. I Love it." claims that "gay marriage isn't in it. That marriage of any form isn't in it. That the right to privacy about your body (which somehow magically justifies abortion) isn't in it."

Hmmm, yet that silly Consitution also mentions that the "enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people."

It seems to me that the Founders were specifically fearful of the tactic that "I know it. I Live it. I Love it." employs. I also have a susicion that if he understood the right to privacy as understood in the courts, he would absolutely be in favor of it. It limits the reach and power of government.

Irony Guy
Bountiful, Utah

Took the quiz. It was dumb. It's not about the Constitution so much as about trivia. You could know most of this stuff and still know little about the Constitution itself. Who cares who was the oldest and who was the youngest to sign it. Why not ask what's IN it? That's what matters.

wrz
Pheonix, AZ

"What do you know about the U.S. Constitution?"

I know that it's regularly ignored by Congress and the White House. And the Supreme Court finds stuff in it that's not there... such as abortion and Obamacare. It's not only hanging by a thread, the thread is seriously frayed.

@Oatmeal:
"I also have a susicion that if he understood the right to privacy as understood in the courts, he would absolutely be in favor of it. It limits the reach and power of government."

The point being... if it's not a power specifically delegated by the Constitution to the federal government it is relegated to the states and the people. In which case the Supreme Court should rule that it has no jurisdiction and pass the onus to the Congress or the states for action. The Court's job is to rule on constitutionality. If there's nothing in the Constitution on the subject in question, they can't rule, seems to me.

@Irony Guy:
"You could know most of this stuff and still know little about the Constitution itself."

That seems to be the case of the justices on the Court.

Stalwart Sentinel
San Jose, CA

I know it... and wrz

Sincere question: do you actually believe your own propaganda? And, do you believe your "brilliant" arguments are so persuasive as to overcome the legal test of strict scrutiny?

My recollection is that marriage has been clearly understood to be a fundamental right protected under the COTUS since about 1888 or so. Do you honestly think that arguments similar to yours have never been made? Or, is it possible that lawyers have already elicited your concerns but have come up wanting?

Don't get me wrong, I love the fact that you anti-marriage equality folks are so far behind the legal "eight ball" that you're still making arguments that have been failing for more than 120 years; truly I do. But I really want to know what you're hoping to gain by using tired, worn out losing arguments.

wrz
Pheonix, AZ

@Stalwart Sentinel:
"Sincere question: do you actually believe your own propaganda?"

What propaganda? I speak only truth.

"And, do you believe your 'brilliant' arguments are so persuasive as to overcome the legal test of strict scrutiny?"

Show me where, in the US Constitution is mentioned 'strict scrutiny.'

"My recollection is that marriage has been clearly understood to be a fundamental right protected under the COTUS since about 1888 or so."

OK... but marriage is not mentioned in the US Constitution. If you think it is, please provide reference. The Supreme Court's job is to examine laws passed by the US Congress and determine Constitutionality if/when challenged.

"Or, is it possible that lawyers have already elicited your concerns but have come up wanting?"

Here's the reality of how it works... SCOTUS is the highest court in the land. Thus nothing can challenge their rulings, right or wrong. If they say abortion is found in the Constitution... then it's in the Constitution.

"Don't get me wrong, I love the fact that you anti-marriage equality folks..."

Anti-marriage? The issue is... what is and is not found in the US constitution.

I know it. I Live it. I Love it.
Salt Lake City, UT

The framers wrote a constitution. Then they passed laws outlawing things like sodomy that went unchallenged.

If back then, homosexuality is outlawed and it is constitutionally sound, then today we want to commend the practice... the only lawful way to accomplish this would be via an amendment, not a court exercising more power than it was authorized to use.

We the people wrote the constitution. We can write another one if we want, and laws to follow. The court has no authority to say "your votes and laws don't count in this instance" because they think OUR constitution meant something other than what it actually meant. Constitutional Review is not lawfully authorized. The courts authorized power only extends to ruling where the law comes into question on a case.

The judicial branch of our government refines the meaning of the law, it does not alter it.

If we accept the court having power to reverse meaning in the constitution, then law has no effect.

Furthermore, the court will have exacted an arbitrary power over our voting rights; whereby the democratic process, our voting rights, will have been in vain... invalidated.

mattrick78
Cedar City, UT

"If back then, homosexuality is outlawed and it is constitutionally sound, then today we want to commend the practice... the only lawful way to accomplish this would be via an amendment"

I am not a constitutional scholar nor a proponent of sodomy (at least in practice) but I think you fail to make a distinction between what is in the Constitution and was outlawed by Congress. You don't necessarily need an amendment to the Constitution to change every law passed in the legislature.

Ultra Bob
Cottonwood Heights, UT

The American Constitution and Bill of Rights are in fact the first pages of the American Code which is the body of law applicable to the American nation and the people there in.

Every law passed by Congress and signed by the President is in fact an addition to or an amendment to previous law. Previous law which of course includes the Constitution. New laws thus created can be properly thought of as amendments to the Constitution and carry the same authorization and recognition as the Constitution itself.

The Supreme Court of the United States has the authority to strike down any laws that it feels is contrary to the intent and purpose of the original Constitution. The Court also has the authority to define the intent and purpose of the Constitution and thus also has the ability to “amend” the Constitution.

The people themselves have the authority to amend the Constitution. But so far have only exercised that right in the election of the President.

mattrick78
Cedar City, UT

"New laws thus created can be properly thought of as amendments to the Constitution and carry the same authorization and recognition as the Constitution itself."

The Constitution provides the framework for those new laws to become laws. Not sure what you mean by "property thought of" if you are trying to equate new laws as on the same level of weight and importance as amendments to Constitution. If so, then that is incorrect. New laws can be voted easily from the books. Amendments to the Constitution itself require so much more.

wrz
Pheonix, AZ

@Ultra Bob:
"The American Constitution and Bill of Rights are in fact the first pages of the American Code which is the body of law applicable to the American nation and the people there in."

No, no. There is a significant difference... the Constitution, including the Bill of Rights is changed by amendment requiring ratification by 3/4the of the state legislators. Laws can be changed, modified, deleted, etc., with the approval of the Congress and president.

"The people themselves have the authority to amend the Constitution. But so far have only exercised that right in the election of the President."

Wrong on both counts.

The people cannot amend the Constitution. Only the Congress can amend... with the approval of the states, as above.

Per my count, there are 27 amendments to-date. The 22 amendment deals with the election of the president.

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