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Grading Utah school: Top 50 lowest scoring high schools

Published: Monday, Sept. 9 2013 4:06 p.m. MDT

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Utah schools received their report cards on Sept. 3 with the release of new school grades based on proficiency in language arts, mathematics and science, and the growth students demonstrated year over year on end-of-level testing.

The grades were given in compliance with a law enacted by the Utah Legislature in 2011 and modified in 2013.

According to the initial data release, 56 percent of Utah schools earned either an A or a B grade, with 11 percent earning an A grade, 45 percent earning a B grade, 30 percent earning a C grade, 10 percent earning a D grade and 4 percent earning an F.

All schools can earn up to 300 points for having students achieve proficiency in language arts, math and science. The schools can earn another 300 points by showing growth for all students and those who are below proficient.

High school grades were given on a 750-point scale as the schools stood to earn up to an additional 150 points based on graduation rates.

Here's a look at the 50 lowest scoring high schools according to the new data.

Related: Grades for Utah schools bring strong reaction from parents and educators

Related: Utah charter schools' grades no better than traditional schools

Related: School grading systems: a hot topic around the nation
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marlli
Herriman, UT

The Jason Project: this one program alone can help every school improve their science, ELA, and math scores, if the teachers will work together to utilize ALL the resources available through the websites. It is especially useful and effective for grades 4-8. Take my word, as a 26-year veteran of the classroom. Best of luck to you schools with F's. OH, yes -- and stop trying to teach in TWO languages. English. We speak English in American classrooms, unless you sign up to learn a "foreign" language.

Strider303
Salt Lake City, UT

Utah's schools: tens of thousands of students, thousands of employees, millions of dollars in infrastructure and salaries, myriads of degrees, talents, abilities and personalities. And all the legislature can concoct as a report is a single letter grade?

That is so bogus! Public and private employees get evaluations that comment of various portions of their employment performance. You take your car in for an oil change and there is a systems report by the service staff to inform you how your car is performing and to point your attention to needed service areas.

You send you child to school and meet periodically with the teacher and get some verbal and sometimes written information on progress. And all the legislature can come up with is a single letter grade?

Folks, this is insulting to reason and common sense. I suggest the legislature spend less time and lobbyist sponsored lunches and more time on this one.

I most totally disagree with this bone-headed process.

Kings Court
Alpine, UT

Once again, this grading system is a great tool for identifying lower class neighborhoods and schools who cater to troubled youth (most of the schools at the bottom of the list are alternative schools for troubled youth with poor family lives and juvenile delinquents), but it really doesn't tell you anything about the school.

county mom
Monroe, UT

Strider303, is it fair to guess that you have a vested interest in one of the schools at the bottom of the list?

I can tell you that there is not a school in Utah that is as low a level, comparable to those in Chicago or Detroit. At least our teachers can read and for the most part so can the students.

This grading system is just another tool to help schools see where they stand in comparison to other Utah schools. The last grading system was far to complicated to make any sense of. Maybe this can be looked at as a little incentive to look for improvement?

It could also help parents looking for a private school find one that makes the grade?

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