Industries with the smallest gender wage gap

Published: Sunday, Aug. 18 2013 10:32 p.m. MDT

Associated Press

The gender wage gap continues to be a controversial topic, with some analysts arguing that the research showing a discrepancy between men and women’s wages is faulty and misguided.

Researchers who continue to believe that men are given an unfair advantage in the work force, however, continue to publish their findings despite criticisms of their research.

As the Deseret News reported last March, the Institute for Women's Policy Research released a study that says the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings had decreased from 82.2 percent in 2011 to 80.9 percent in 2012.

In other words, the gap widened in 2012.

It has also been well-documented that women are entering the work force in increasing numbers. The Deseret News reported in June that women are now the primary breadwinners in roughly 40 percent of American families, a number that has quadrupled since the 1960s.

So as more women enter the workplace, it may be important for them to consider which industries offer the fairest wages for their work.

For this reason, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has re-promoted its research, which was first compiled in 2009, on which industries have the smallest gender wage gap.

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Lakers
Sandy, UT

I'm glad that this article gave a mention and a link to the other side of the story- an important side- that reveals that almost all of the gender gap is in fact not a gender gap. Differences in chosen fields, gap years in a career, lack of negotiating salary before starting, etc etc. Once you take out everything except gender, which is admittedly very difficult, you are left with 5% or less.

I am all for equal pay for equal work, but I find it sad that many men and women have a view of the world being cruel and unfair in this regard when it actually isn't. Victimhood is a huge barrier to personal or career success and happiness; if I were to feel like no matter what I did I would always be 20% "behind" I think that feeling would be almost as bad as the lagging pay itself. So if you're female, or male for that matter, fear not, the gender gap is not nearly what it's portrayed as being. It flames up readers and opinions and gets the pot stirring, so it comes up often, but in the vast majority of workplaces it's a farce.

open minded
Lehi, UT

I find it pretty awesome that the top 7 industries all have strong UNION ties.

Howard Beal
Provo, UT

If I were to go to Provo School District say and asked to see their pay scale for teachers, would I find as the article said women making 77 cents on the dollar to men? Or would I find the same exact pay scale for all employees based on the same criteria (work experience and educational achievement). Again, this is all bogus statistics...

Hamath
Omaha, NE

These statistics about women pay are actually possibly a serious problem going forward. What % of students at any particular college are women? Nationally, it's now between 60-70%, and it's climbing even higher. Giving women equal opportunities has been the focus for so long and we've focused on them for so long that the practices have "paid off" and now way more women than men go to college. These women and those like them who have graduated over the last 10 years, will have better opportunities and better pay of course as they take leadership roles more often than in the past.

What is troubling to me, is the young men now. Not the women. In England they've had this problem for about 15 years longer than we have. The did the same thing as we have, and like us, overdid it. The result... staggering unemployment in the 30-something male population. They are calling it the Lost Generation. How many males out there are disengaged in school? Too many in my opinion. It's possible have too many "Women in Engineering" clubs and not enough "Engineering Clubs". Other changes are needed, I'm sure.

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