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The life and service of Sister Frances J. Monson

Published: Friday, May 17 2013 4:31 p.m. MDT

Friday morning, Sister Frances Beverly Johnson Monson died in a Salt Lake City hospital at the age of 85. She was surrounded by family.

Sister Monson was known for her love, compassion, understanding and encouragement. The support she gave to her husband, Thomas S. Monson, president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, during his many church callings has been unfailing and sincere.

In President Monson’s biography, “To the Rescue,” he expresses his feelings for his wife and the sacrifices she has made.

“If there was ever a heroine in my life, it would have to be Frances.”

Daughter and former General Young Women Counselor Ann Dibb spoke of the support her mother gave.

"My mother is the other part of my father’s success story because she has been supportive of him in everything he’s done,” Sister Dibb said.

Sister Monson was born on Oct. 27, 1927, to Franz E. Johnson and Hildur Booth Johnson and was the only daughter of their five children.

“I am so grateful for my mother-in-law,” President Monson said in his biography. “She brought into the world a lovely daughter who is my wife and companion, who I can assure you is her husband’s keeper, and the keeper of her children as well — a noble daughter of our Heavenly Father.”

Sister Monson spent many hours serving in the Relief Society and Primary. She also served with her husband in the LDS Canadian Mission, headquartered in Toronto, Ontario.

A sense of humor was another of Sister Monson's attributes. The LDS Church Newsroom quoted President Monson describing a humorous experience with his wife.

“Several years ago my dear wife went to the hospital. She left a note behind for the children: ‘Dear children, do not let Daddy touch the microwave’ — followed by a comma ‘or the stove, or the dishwasher, or the dryer.’ I’m embarrassed to add any more to that list.”

Sister Dibb said her mother was never one to look for recognition.

“My mother is unlike many of the women of today’s generation,” Sister Dibb said in an Ensign article titled “President Thomas S. Monson: Finishing the Course, Keeping the Faith.” “Instead of looking for the recognition of the world, she has always received her acknowledgment of worth from such things as the happy smile of a son or the outstretched hand of a grandchild.”

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