BYU's 2013 class includes a stellar group of returned missionaries

Published: Friday, Feb. 8 2013 1:49 p.m. MST

Toloa’i Ho Ching, 6-0, 225 LB, Alta High School Next » 3 of 8 « Prev


Ho Ching left immediately for his mission to Orlando, Fla. out of High School. He’s likely to play at inside linebacker, but will be hard pressed to see playing time there immediately given the existing depth and talent at the position.

Up next: Tuni Kanuch, defensive lineman
Next » 3 of 8 « Prev
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CougFaninTX
Frisco, TX

Kaufusi and Kanuch will be anchors on the D line for several years to come.

gdog3finally
West Jordan, Utah

Some are always leaving and some are always coming back. Recruiting and the revolving door.

Cougarcrazed
Visalia, CA

Elder Black served his mission in our area, and he's an intense young man. If anyone is capable of getting back into playing shape after serving a mission, it's him. I expect to see him starting. He's going to be a huge asset for BYU this year.

Who am I sir?
Cottonwood Heights, UT

These signees were before the "independent" thing. Therefore, six of the eight were rated three star at the time of signing. I would expect them to contribute once they regain playing condition (after two year absence.).Good news for cougar fans.

Rikitikitavi
Cardston, Alberta

We know from years of experience that RM's at BYU are truly "over-achievers". Especially those who are married due to their focus on what is truly most important:family, education, and service to the Lord. It should come as no surprise that "star ranking" for recruits means little at BYU. These athletes have focus, work ethic, dedication, leadership etc. etc. The maturity they bring is always an added dimension few teams can enjoy. Often talent will not trump these qualities for the contribution they offer on any BYU team. So we can expect some very fine performances in the coming years as always from Cougar recruits who have served missions.

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