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Lois M. Collins
Lois M. Collins is a reporter and columnist for the Deseret News. While she writes primarily on health and family issues for the national and news sections, she also writes a biweekly column and her work appears often in the feature section. Collins spent most of her childhood in Idaho Falls and graduated a long time ago from the University of Utah with a degree in communications. She's won numerous national, regional and local writing awards, but is most proud of the fact she once stepped out of a perfectly good airplane in midair for a story. She and her husband, Beaux, have two "tween" daughters and live in Salt Lake City. She uses her middle initial because there are a LOT of Lois Collinses out there.
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As fewer couples marry, some argue the institution really isn't crucial; kids just need two parents committed to raising them. Others argue that marriage provides stability that's otherwise elusive and provides...
The happier the wife is with long-term marriage, the better the husband's life, "not matter how he feels about their nuptials," according to a study in Journal of Marriage and Family.
A new study says that children in wealthier families where parents split up are more prone to misbehave than kids in lower-income families — and it's not just a loss of money that does it.
When Twitter lit up with #whyIstayed, the tweets were sprinkled with references to religious teachings. But God and spirituality weren't big players in the #whyIleft conversation.
One-fifth of families could not live on a cash-only basis without overhauling their lifestyle, according to a national poll that found they need a credit card just to maintain their current lifestyle.
Several recent reports make clear that the touted economic recovery has helped upper-income folks much more than it has helped those in other income brackets. Low- and mid-income families continue to lag, and c...
Music is magic for children. Learning to play an instrument provides kids with great benefits, from boosted ability to multitask to speech perception and much more.
Sitting on an old stump in a canyon recently, I listened with joy to the warble of a bird and the babble of the creek. There are worse remnants of hearing to have left, but I miss the unamplified joy in my daug...
Research on grandparents tends to focus on either those living with grandchildren or the frail elderly who are in long-term care. That misses most of the 64 million-plus, including "midlife" grands who fit play...
In 2014 America, there's no majority family form and no typical mom, according to a new report from a researcher at the University of Maryland.