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Lois M. Collins
Lois M. Collins is a reporter and columnist for the Deseret News. While she writes primarily on family issues for the national and news sections, she also writes a biweekly column and her work appears often in the feature section. Collins spent most of her childhood in Idaho Falls and graduated a long time ago from the University of Utah with a degree in communications. She's won numerous national, regional and local writing awards, but is most proud of the fact she once stepped out of a perfectly good airplane in midair for a story. She and her husband, Beaux, have two nearly grown daughters and live in Salt Lake City. She uses her middle initial because there are a LOT of Lois Collinses out there.
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A new study shows daters hold a dim view of fidelity among those who are dating. But they have a carve out for those with whom they go out.
Parents concerned about what's in the products they buy for their families and the effects they might have just got a boost from a major retailer.
When Save the Children compared child well-being in 19 wealthy countries, American kids came in at the middle of the pack.
Oregon State University and Stanford University teamed up with a group of Girl Scouts to show that when children learn about a certain subject, parents are likely to emulate their changed behavior.
You don't have to be a bride or groom to be stressed by a wedding. There's enough worry to go around. But men and women worry differently about someone else's wedding.
Montrell Jackson was bruised and made heart-sore by the volatility of the discussion of police vs. blacks. He was both black and blue, a 32-year-old black man who had chosen to be a police officer and help prot...
A study led by Johns Hopkins University sociologist Andrew J. Cherlin points to one feature in the American economy that may be putting extra pressure on the institution of marriage, leading some to forego or p...
The number of "gray divorces" continues to rise. As longtime marriages break up, there may be a new financial tool on the horizon, according to Forbes. It's called a "divorce mortgage," and here's how it works.
The Consumer Federation of America and the Funeral Consumers Alliance are asking the Federal Trade Commission to require funeral homes and others to post the cost of their services online.
A pair of algorithm lovers believe that math theory — think "37 Percent Rule" — identifies the ideal marriage age.