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Chandra Johnson
Chandra Johnson is a Utah transplant who has covered the justice system, education, social services and politics. Originally from Montana, she graduated with a B.A. in journalism and history from the University of Montana in 2007. After six years in Taos, New Mexico, she relocated to Utah, where she eventually joined the team at The Deseret News as an enterprise reporter. She enjoys wide open spaces, gardening, good grammar, pottery and long walks in the library. Find her on Twitter @ChandraMJohnson. Email her at chjohnson@deseretnews.com.

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A Canadian public health study has linked hours of social media use with mental health issues in teens.
A high-profile lawsuit against late-night personality Conan O'Brien and a new copyright policy on Twitter has sparked debate about online plagiarism.
Some past studies have suggested that food advertising that makes food appear appealing is partially responsible for America's rising obesity epidemic. Now another study looks at how disgusting images can repel...
YouTube filmmaker and app developer Casey Neistat knows it's a given people will use their phones to share information with friends. But his new app, Beme, looks to limit the phone's encroachment on everyday li...
Time Magazine's Trump insult generator is the latest example of how the news media is struggling with whether or not to take republican presidential candidate Donald Trump seriously.
Social media isn’t always the ideal place to stage a healthy and diverse debate on political beliefs, as U.S. presidential candidate Chris Christie learned this month on Twitter.
A new survey from the Pew Research Center this week finds that 21st-century parents say they rely on social media for emotional support and parenting questions.
The L.A. Times recently hired a reporter to exclusively cover Black Twitter, or a Twitter community of black activists.
Since the early 1990s surge of iconic fairy tale films to Pixar films, Disney characters have always made popular baby names.
The viral Vine video trend #DontJudgeChallenge seeks to put value on personality traits over outward appearance, but some say it misses its mark.