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Daniel Peterson
Daniel Peterson teaches Arabic studies, founded BYU's Middle Eastern Texts Initiative, directs mormonscholarstestify.org, chairs mormoninterpreter.com, blogs daily at patheos.com/blogs/danpeterson and speaks only for himself.

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The idea that humans have the potential to become like God isn't peculiarly Mormon. It's an ancient Christian doctrine that was largely forgotten in the West for centuries — until it was restored through ...
The Book of Mormon account of Lehi's journey to the New World echoes the earlier biblical story of Israel's exodus from Egypt in remarkably complex ways. Young Joseph Smith's biblical knowledge doesn't seem sop...
Some see the Gadianton robbers as an obvious borrowing from early 19th-century America. But history knows many other such movements.
Physics and chemistry are radically transforming our understanding of "matter." Does Mormonism also offer transforming insights on that subject? A Catholic philosopher argues that it does.
Did religion originate as a primitive form of science? Has contemporary science rendered it obsolete? The answer to both questions seems to be a clear "no."
The annual FairMormon conference will be held next week in Provo. Presenters will cover a wide variety of interesting topics, and anyone who is interested is welcome to attend.
The original Christian apostles were closely interrelated men from a tiny provincial area. Were they appropriate leaders for a worldwide church? The Lord plainly thought so.
Even if they can't prove it, those who argue for the antiquity of the Book of Mormon can be, and often are, engaged in reasonable and justifiable scholarship.
The most rich and concentrated scriptural data that we have about the condition of the early Christian church after Christ suggests not vigor, optimism and promise but with problems and the need to endure to th...
It's easy to romanticize other times, when (we imagine) things were simpler and clearer. But this is our time. And the good old days weren't all that different, anyway.