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Amy Choate-Nielsen
Amy Choate-Nielsen is a special projects reporter for the Deseret News where she covers a variety of in-depth issues, including the environment, public welfare and education. Since joining the paper in 2004, she has covered municipal politics in Utah County as well as the west side of Salt Lake County. As a Utah transplant originally from Connecticut, Amy graduated from Brigham Young University in Provo with a degree in print journalism, a minor in English and a love of the Beehive State. She lives in the suburbs with her husband and two children.

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Family members may be spread far and wide, but searching cemetery records online can bring them closer.
After a recent rainstorm, I was surprised to see that my son and I had the very same idea.
It turns out the Charles Mehew who was a witness in a murder trial in 1873 wasn't who I thought he was — and neither was my great-grandfather.
The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities that receive federal financial aid to publicly report statistics for sex offenses. The intention is to make college a safer place, but experts say more mu...
While colleges across America roil with complaints of Title IX violations, mishandling of campus rape cases and unwillingness to change, Southern Oregon University is turning into a bright spot in a fraught nat...
After doing some sleuthing on the Internet, I found an interesting story with my ancestor's name — but I learned that sometimes, even in newspapers, people are not always as they appear.
Family history research is all about the stories that bind us together. Here is one from my life.
A.J. Jacobs said we treat family with more kindness than we do strangers — but I think I've had it backward.
We called it "tinkle" and "big business" in my family, but my husband called it "No. 1" and "No. 2." In our own family now, our language is a work in progress. It's weird, but sometimes choosing a family dialec...
As a newbie to family history research, I felt a little intimidated attending the world's largest genealogical conference. But Laura Bush put me at ease.