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Sara Israelsen-Hartley
Sara Israelsen-Hartley is a project reporter for the Deseret News where she covers societal and public health issues and their effects on the family. She's written on same-sex marriage, divorce reform, abortion, pornography, etc. During more than eight years with the Deseret News, she’s also covered education, city government, faith in the public square, as well as crime and the judicial system. In 2011, she was honored as the Best Newspaper Reporter by Utah’s Society of Professional Journalists. Originally from Columbia, Missouri, she lives in Bountiful with her husband, Jon, and their two rambunctious sons.

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Today's teens are hungry for information about sexuality and how to put their worlds into context, yet far too many parents —their best sources of information — are far too silent.
Public campaigns and policy changes are necessary to increase sexual assault reporting, but experts say the greatest and most immediate impact comes as friends and family re-evaluate how they think and talk abo...
Media experts and newspaper professionals are seeing a growing stream of "unpublishing requests" from readers who don't want their past published lives instantly Google-able. But deleting unflattering stories c...
Creating accountability and rebuilding relationships are crucial to recovering from pornography addiction, therapists say, because pornography addiction is so isolating and shame-creating and recovery is a long...
Despite the case’s Texas roots, experts say Whole Women’s Health v. Hellerstedt (formerly Cole), has the potential to dramatically change the abortion landscape across the country, and fulfill the p...
The struggle against pornography is real, but helping teens identify underlying stressors and learn healthier coping mechanisms may curb porn use faster than attacking porn itself.
Crime dramas that try to break down rape myths, focus on issues of consent and don't blame victims help viewers feel more confident in turning down unwanted sexual activity and responding respectfully when a pa...
Despite growing cultural acceptance of pornography, experts say seeing it as a public health problem allows for a better discussion and stronger opposition than arguing from religious or moral standpoints.
Rather than empty threats or judicial involvement, teens caught sexting need more education about appropriate online behavior and healthy relationship skills, which can come from parents, school officials and p...
Children of parents who talk about the negative impacts of pornography are more likely to have negative views of porn when they get into college and are thus less likely to use it.