Quantcast
George F. Will
George F. Will is one of the most widely recognized, and widely read, writers in the world. With more than 450 newspapers, his biweekly Newsweek column, and his appearances as a political commentator on ABC, Will may be the most influential writer in America. Will began his syndicated column with The Writers Group on Jan. 1, 1974, just four months after The Writers Group was founded by Ben Bradlee and Katharine Graham. Two years later, Will started his bi-weekly column for Newsweek. In 1977, he won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary, for his newspaper columns, and garnered awards for his Newsweek columns. Today Will serves as a contributing analyst with ABC News and has been a regular member of ABC's "This Week" on Sunday mornings since 1981. Will's email address is georgewill@washpost.com.
more...

Connect with George F. Will

twitter @georgewillf Subscribe

Lord Nigel Lawson explained that the June 23 referendum, which he hopes will withdraw Britain from the European Union, was never supposed to happen. It's the fulfillment of a promise Prime Minister David Camero...
Leaders of the campaign to end Britain's membership in the European Union hope that next month's referendum will make June 23, 2016, a date as luminous in modern British history as May 3, 1979, when voters made...
Britain's June 23 vote regarding exit from the EU is the most important European vote since 1945.
The two federally chartered but privately owned GSEs, which guarantee 80 percent of American mortgages, were created because Washington wanted to engineer — what could go wrong? — more homeownership...
Puerto Rico's troubles will benefit America if the bond market, sobered by a demonstration that government bonds can be risky, becomes a restraint on state legislatures by raising the cost of borrowing where th...
Voters can only surmise what Trump is hiding by refusing to release his tax returns, and can only guess how much he is exaggerating his wealth, or how much he has made from the money his father gave him.
There is a consensus that aggression by one nation against another is a serious matter, but there is no comparable consensus about what constitutes aggression.
Secrets are property, and covetous, acquisitive government bureaucracies hoard them from rival bureaucracies, thereby making government even more foolish than it naturally tends to be because it has no competit...
Hillary Clinton's supposedly supreme presidential qualification is not her public prominence, which is derivative from her marriage, or her unremarkable tenure in a similarly derivative Senate seat. It is her f...
The progress from 1870 to 1970 was unusual and is not likely to recur in the future. America's entitlement state is buckling under the pressure of an aging population retiring into Social Security and Medicare ...