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Amy Joi O'Donoghue
Amy Joi O'Donoghue is the environmental reporter the Deseret News, specializing in coverage of issues that affect land, air, water and energy development. She has worked here since 1998 and has been an assistant city editor and reported on the governorís office, health and human services and criminal justice issues. In Ogden, she worked at the Standard-Examiner for 15 years as a reporter and editor. A native of Ogden, Amy Joi started writing while still in grade school and went on to attend Weber State University as an honors student in political science and communications. She has won multiple awards over her career and would like to go onto graduate school.

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Sampling at Lake Powell shows normal levels of contaminants that meet drinking water standards and sediment results that are within "recreational" range. Long-term monitoring will continue after the Aug. 5 brea...
August rain totals well above average for three consecutive years have helped Utah weather the impacts of limited snowpack and other drought conditions. The rain prevented tapping into reservoir storage by farm...
Field offices of the Utah Bureau of Land Management want to conduct population studies of wild horses and burros to arrive at better management strategies. Leaders from several rural counties in Utah have compl...
Even in the face of mounting pressures over mining and coal-fired power plants, Utah's coal industry is looking to stay in business through planned mine expansions and a possible shipping port for foreign marke...
There's been a steady march to closure for the nation's coal-fired power plants, which raises questions about coal as a source of energy going into the future. Utah has not escaped its own closures, and groups ...
More than 1,400 men have died in Utah coal mining accidents simply trying to make a living, leaving wives, children and grieving communities behind. Two men led a small committee and raised $400,000 to erect me...
Coal mining and its use for electricity has been a way of life for over a century in Utah, fed by the vast coal beds. Now, the war on coal some say is being waged by the White House has come to the state's door...
Utah coal has pioneer roots, going back to the 1850s when the territorial legislature offered a cash prize for coal found within 40 miles of Salt Lake City. With power plants closing and tough regulations, what...
The tension over a threatened listing of the greater sage grouse is mounting, as Utah officials complain that negotiations with the federal government have broken down. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must m...
People don't mind having less grass in their landscaping if it means the water saved ends up on a farm. An Envision Utah poll shows how people believe water resources should be managed into 2050, when the state...