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Behind the masks: Why some Utahns choose masks to cope with the dirty air

Published: Saturday, Aug. 1 2015 9:05 p.m. MDT

Todd Seymour, an anesthesiologist, poses for a photo in Salt Lake City on Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. Seymour made an air filtration system out of a car tire pump, recycled plastic bottles, epoxy, filters, a ventilation bag and rechargeable batteries that supplies him with a steady stream of clean air while he bike commutes to work. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News) Todd Seymour, an anesthesiologist, poses for a photo in Salt Lake City on Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. Seymour made an air filtration system out of a car tire pump, recycled plastic bottles, epoxy, filters, a ventilation bag and rechargeable batteries that supplies him with a steady stream of clean air while he bike commutes to work. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

There were 31 days above federal Clean Air Act standards during the inversion season from Nov. 1, 2013, to March 1, 2014, compared to 29 days during the same period the previous season. Government officials have noticed, and are working in the Legislature and elsewhere to set standards and find solutions to clean the air. But for some Utahns a temporary solution comes in the form of a mask, providing comfort in some ways, and health helps in others.

Here is a look at what motivates the people living life behind a mask

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