Quantcast

Band with Utah roots and Mormon members, Imagine Dragons, awarded Grammy

Published: Friday, Aug. 28 2015 12:14 a.m. MDT

From left, Ben McKee, Wayne Sermon, Dan Reynolds and Dan Platzman of Imagine Dragons arrive at the 56th annual Grammy Awards at Staples Center on Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014, in Los Angeles. (Jordan Strauss, Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP) From left, Ben McKee, Wayne Sermon, Dan Reynolds and Dan Platzman of Imagine Dragons arrive at the 56th annual Grammy Awards at Staples Center on Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014, in Los Angeles. (Jordan Strauss, Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

Imagine Dragons has come a long way since a September 2012 interview with the Deseret News.

"In our case, we got a lot of little starts. But it doesn't matter if we're playing to four or five people in a lounge or in a concert hall, we want to use our music to uplift people,” band member Wayne Sermon, a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, said in the article.

Sunday night the band performed with Kendrick Lamar at the 56th annual Grammy Awards, while artists like Lorde, Taylor Swift and Steven Tyler smiled, danced or sang along — a far cry from four or five people and the band's Utah roots.

“With Kendrick's phenomenal stage presence and Imagine Dragons' energy, this pair gave one of the best showings of the night (maybe ever?!). … Thank you, Kendrick and Imagine Dragons. This is what the Grammys is all about!” E! Online wrote.

Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons performs at the Grammy Awards. (Matt Sayles, Matt Sayles/Invision/AP) Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons performs at the Grammy Awards. (Matt Sayles, Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)

On top of the well-received performance, the band won a Grammy in Best Rock Performance with “Radioactive,” beating well-known performers like David Bowie, Led Zeppelin and Jack White.

The band was also nominated for Record Of The Year with Daft Punk, Lorde, Bruno Mars and Robin Thicke.

According to Rolling Stone, despite having the third-biggest-selling track of 2013, "Radioactive," band members were not confident about walking away with an award.

“Let me just say we are definitely not going into this thinking we’re going to win a Grammy," lead singer Dan Reynolds said in the article. "We’re up for Record of the Year, and 'Radioactive’ was a big song. But songs like ‘Blurred Lines’ were huge. If I were a voter, I’d be like, ‘Robin Thicke was at the VMAs with his pin-striped suit, and Lorde is cute — and who are Imagine Dragons? I have no idea what those dudes even look like!’ When that’s the take, you know you’re not going to win that award."

Kendrick Lamar, left, and Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons perform at the Grammy Awards. (Matt Sayles, Matt Sayles/Invision/AP) Kendrick Lamar, left, and Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons perform at the Grammy Awards. (Matt Sayles, Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)

Band members paid tribute to those who helped them get where they are.

“Best Rock Performance Grammy. What a crazy night. Could not be more grateful to all of you who brought us here,” reads the band's Facebook page.

A story from The Huffington Post also shared how the band connects with fans, sometimes very individually. The article shows a video of Tyler Robinson, a fan who had struggled with cancer, interacting with Reynolds, another Latter-day Saint band member.

Members of Imagine Dragons pose in the press room with the Grammy Award for best rock performance. (Dan Steinberg, Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP) Members of Imagine Dragons pose in the press room with the Grammy Award for best rock performance. (Dan Steinberg, Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP)

“What you'll see: Dan Reynolds calls Tyler on stage. They sing 'It's Time"' together, arms locked, heads touching. And Tyler, bald but cancer free, shouts out the chorus. … Tyler Robinson loved a song that affirmed him, and he got to express everything he believed with the people who created it. He was one lucky kid,” the article reads.

Alison Moore is a writer for the Faith and Family sections at DeseretNews.com. She is studying journalism and editing at Brigham Young University. EMAIL: amoore@deseretdigital.com

Copyright 2015, Deseret News Publishing Company