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Why LDS artist Alex Boye took part in viral Mormon version of 'That's What Makes You Beautiful'

Published: Thursday, Oct. 3 2013 1:55 p.m. MDT

Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women "Standards Night" was not something that LDS artist Alex Boye had planned to do. In fact, it wasn't even his stake young men group that he worked with, but he felt impressed by the message they had to share. (YouTube)

Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women's Standards Night was not something LDS artist Alex Boye had planned to do, but he felt impressed by the message they had to share.

A video was planned by Kellie Jepson and Tammy Ogden, who were in charge of planning a standards night around modesty. They wanted to do something different to help the girls recognize the importance of modesty. That's when they decided to take the hit song "That's What Makes You Beautiful" by One Direction and give it a modesty makeover with the help of the young men in the stake.

It wasn't until their sound system broke on the day of filming that Boye became involved.

"Kellie sent a message to my wife Julie and asked if we had a sound system," Boye said. "Julie said, 'Hey, do you mind taking this sound system down to Alta High School where they are shooting a music video? … Oh, by the way, they want you to do some choreography for the kids.’ ”

Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women "Standards Night" was not something that LDS artist Alex Boye had planned to do. In fact, it wasn't even his stake young men group that he worked with, but he felt impressed by the message they had to share. (YouTube)

Not knowing what the music video was for or what he was getting himself into, Boye agreed to help.

"So I went, being the obedient husband, and I ended up having so much fun," Boye said. "These kids, they were just so awesome, good kids. They really wanted to do this, so I just had a couple of ideas for the choreography and then they said, 'Well why don't you be in it?’ ”

Although Boye first dismissed their invitation, he ended up enjoying the production and working with the young women and men so much that he joined in.

"I was having so much fun," Boye said. "I was acting like a goofball."

In Boye's opinion, the fact that this message was given to the young women by their peers increases the impact.

Alex Boye performs Alex Boye performs "Rock-a My Soul" during Mormon Tabernacle Choir concert in Norfolk, Va., on Monday, June 20. Monday, June, 20, 2011. Photo by Gerry Avant (Gerry Avant)

"That's what made it most effective, and now look at all the young women who have shared it online to all their peers. That's a really cool thing," Boye said.

"We just had so much fun, and I think that's why people have connected with it so much because you could tell that they wanted to be there. … They were so willing to do it. You could see it."

A second video was also filmed interviewing each of the young men, allowing them to express their thoughts about modesty.

"That's the one that got me the most," Boye said. "Apparently you could hear a pin drop because you've got their peers, the guys, talking about modesty. … That part was really, really awesome."

Alex Boye participates at America's Freedom Festival at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, Sunday, June 27, 2010. Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News (Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News) Alex Boye participates at America's Freedom Festival at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, Sunday, June 27, 2010. Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News (Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News)

In both the interview portion and the video, Boye explained that showing the boys' honest feelings was what made the project so impactful.

"It wasn't something that someone told them they had to do. They were each sharing their own personal testimony about modesty," Boye said. "You could tell it was real for them."

Boye said that although this video was made to help remind the young women about the importance of modesty, it doesn't leave out the responsibility young men also have to themselves and the women around them.

"Of course it's not all just on the women and how they dress," Boye said. "Of course the men, they've got to play their part, too."

Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women "Standards Night" was not something that LDS artist Alex Boye had planned to do. In fact, it wasn't even his stake young men group that he worked with, but he felt impressed by the message they had to share. (YouTube)

The YouTube video, "Virtue Makes You Beautiful," has had more than 60,000 views, and Boye's inbox has started to fill up with feedback.

"All the young women leaders from all over have contacted me," Boye said. "I think I've got four or five emails, one from Idaho, one from Arizona, wanting me to come and do the same thing for them."

While the video has garnered many comments, not all have been positive or supportive of the message. In regard to the negative responses, Boye restated the advice he shared with those who produced the video.

"That's when you know you're doing something right, when you stand up for what you believe," Boye said. "When you put yourself out there, that's what you're going to get, but you have to stay strong to what you believe."

Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women Participating in the Lone Peak Sandy Stake's Young Women "Standards Night" was not something that LDS artist Alex Boye had planned to do. In fact, it wasn't even his stake young men group that he worked with, but he felt impressed by the message they had to share. (YouTube)

Email: spetersen@deseretnews.com

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