Quantcast

Affirmative Action still needed, argues Harvard's Natasha Warikoo

Published: Monday, June 24 2013 1:35 p.m. MDT

Abigail Fisher, the Texan involved in the University of Texas affirmative action case, accompanied by her attorney Bert Rein, talks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. The Supreme Court is taking up a challenge to a University of Texas program that considers race in some college admissions. The case could produce new limits on affirmative action at universities, or roll it back entirely. The University of Texas at Austin President Bill Powers is at right. (Susan Walsh, ASSOCIATED PRESS) Abigail Fisher, the Texan involved in the University of Texas affirmative action case, accompanied by her attorney Bert Rein, talks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012. The Supreme Court is taking up a challenge to a University of Texas program that considers race in some college admissions. The case could produce new limits on affirmative action at universities, or roll it back entirely. The University of Texas at Austin President Bill Powers is at right. (Susan Walsh, ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Even if the Supreme Court is delaying ruling on Affirmative Action’s fate, that doesn’t stop assistant professor at Harvard Graduate School of Education Natasha Kumar Warikoo from pushing the system's merits in an op-ed published in the LA Times.

“University admissions policies in the United States have been highly subjective, responding to the desires and needs of society and the academic institution itself,” Warikoo states as she writes about the history of college admissions in the United States, where at one point in time an applicant’s “manliness” was a deciding factor. “Race-based affirmative action is a part of the picture, and it symbolizes a deep commitment on the part of colleges and universities to the pursuit of racial justice in a country plagued by extreme racial inequality.”

Faced with odds of being more likely to be born into poverty than whites and live in areas with lower quality education than whites, minorities need Affirmative Action in order to have an equal shot at higher education.

Copyright 2015, Deseret News Publishing Company