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4-year-old Chihuahua finds a home after saving family

Published: Tuesday, Sept. 1 2015 7:26 p.m. MDT

Nine-year-old Chehala Moore hugs her new best friend, 4-year-old Chihuahua Snowee, who saved her life. The dog woke  Moore and her mother Tonya Ostrander Dec. 10 at 2:30 a.m. The house was filled with carbon monoxide. Both were treated and released. Snowee was adopted Dec. 13, 2012, from the Humane Society of Utah. (Tonya Ostrander) Nine-year-old Chehala Moore hugs her new best friend, 4-year-old Chihuahua Snowee, who saved her life. The dog woke Moore and her mother Tonya Ostrander Dec. 10 at 2:30 a.m. The house was filled with carbon monoxide. Both were treated and released. Snowee was adopted Dec. 13, 2012, from the Humane Society of Utah. (Tonya Ostrander)

WEST JORDAN — A 4-year-old Chihuahua found a new home after saving the lives of a West Jordan mother and daughter.

Tonya Ostrander brought the dog named Snow home from the Humane Society of Utah on a trial basis on Dec. 6. She had been looking for a companion for her 9-year-old daughter, Chehala Moore, who is legally blind.

"When they met, there was an instant bond," Ostrander said.

About 2:30 a.m. Dec. 10, the mother and daughter were awakened by the sound of Snow barking.

“We were really ill,” Ostrander said, “and when I found out that we both had the same symptoms, I called an ambulance right away.”

Doctors found elevated levels of carbon monoxide in their systems, she said. They were given oxygen and released a few hours later.

Snow, the 4-year-old Chihuahua, saved a West Jordan mother and her daughter from carbon monoxide poisoning. On Dec. 10, around 2:30 a.m., she barked until Tonya Ostrander and her daughter woke up. The dog that was staying at the home on a trial basis, is now an official member of the family and has been renamed Snowee. (, Humane Society of Utah) Snow, the 4-year-old Chihuahua, saved a West Jordan mother and her daughter from carbon monoxide poisoning. On Dec. 10, around 2:30 a.m., she barked until Tonya Ostrander and her daughter woke up. The dog that was staying at the home on a trial basis, is now an official member of the family and has been renamed Snowee. (, Humane Society of Utah)

“I know Snow saved our lives,” Ostrander said. “We probably would have never woken up if she hadn't started barking to alert us something was really wrong.”

After recovering from their ordeal, Ostrander decided to make Snow, now known as Snowee, part of the family and adopted her from the Humane Society on Dec. 13.

Snowee and Chehala are inseparable and are now best friends, Ostrander said.

Viviane Vo-Duc

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