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New Pa. insurance system debuts after few glitches

Published: Monday, July 6 2015 3:00 p.m. MDT

FILE - This Sept. 11, 2013 file photo shows the federal government form for applying for health coverage, in Washington. Getting covered through President Barack Obamaís health care law might feel like a combination of doing your taxes and making a big purchase that requires research. Youíll need accurate income information for your household, plus some understanding of how health insurance works, so you can get the financial assistance you qualify for and pick a health plan thatís right for your needs. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File) (J. David Ake, AP) FILE - This Sept. 11, 2013 file photo shows the federal government form for applying for health coverage, in Washington. Getting covered through President Barack Obamaís health care law might feel like a combination of doing your taxes and making a big purchase that requires research. Youíll need accurate income information for your household, plus some understanding of how health insurance works, so you can get the financial assistance you qualify for and pick a health plan thatís right for your needs. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File) (J. David Ake, AP)

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A new insurance system for Pennsylvanians under President Barack Obama's signature health care law is up and running online, but with glitches that are making enrollment difficult.

Tuesday was the first day residents could review information on the 56 health plans available to Pennsylvanians, such as rates and networks, and could start shopping.

Coverage under the plans begins Jan. 1.

Heavy traffic on the website healthcare.gov has apparently created problems.

In Philadelphia, an Independence Blue Cross spokeswoman says the insurer is enrolling people through its online system.

Independence is offering 13 different plans on the exchange.

One man getting information at an Independence outreach event, Ralph Kellum, says he knows people who'll be interested in getting insurance after being unable to afford it because of pre-existing conditions.

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