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Bomb kills 15, including 6 Americans

Published: Thursday, May 16 2013 11:01 p.m. MDT

An Afghan man directs his children away from the scene where a suicide car bomber attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, May 16, 2013. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack, killing many in the explosion and wounding tens, police and hospital officials said. The powerful explosion rattled buildings on the other side of Kabul and sent a pillar of white smoke into the sky in the city's east. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus) (Associated Press) An Afghan man directs his children away from the scene where a suicide car bomber attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, May 16, 2013. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack, killing many in the explosion and wounding tens, police and hospital officials said. The powerful explosion rattled buildings on the other side of Kabul and sent a pillar of white smoke into the sky in the city's east. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus) (Associated Press)

KABUL, Afghanistan — A suicide car bombing tore through a U.S. convoy in Kabul on Thursday, killing at least 15 people, including six Americans in a blast so powerful it rattled the other side of the Afghan capital. U.S. soldiers rushed to help, some wearing only T-shirts or shorts under their body armor.

A Muslim militant group claimed responsibility for the morning rush hour attack, saying it was carried out by a new suicide unit formed in response to reports that the U.S. plans to keep bases and troops in Afghanistan even after the 2014 deadline for the end of the foreign combat mission.

The group, Hizb-e-Islami, said its fighters had stalked the Americans for a week to learn their routine before striking — a claim which raises questions about U.S. security procedures.

Two children were among nine Afghan civilians killed in the attack.

"I can't find my children. They're gone. They're gone," their father screamed before collapsing to the ground as neighbors swarmed around to comfort him.

French soldiers with the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, ISAF, carry the body of a victim killed from a suicide car bomber who attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, May 16, 2013. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack, killing many in the explosion and wounding tens, police and hospital officials said. The powerful explosion rattled buildings on the other side of Kabul and sent a pillar of white smoke into the sky in the city's east. (AP Photo/Ahmad Nazar) (Associated Press) French soldiers with the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, ISAF, carry the body of a victim killed from a suicide car bomber who attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, May 16, 2013. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack, killing many in the explosion and wounding tens, police and hospital officials said. The powerful explosion rattled buildings on the other side of Kabul and sent a pillar of white smoke into the sky in the city's east. (AP Photo/Ahmad Nazar) (Associated Press)

Two American soldiers were killed, as were four American civilian contractors with DynCorp International. DynCorp, a U.S. defense contractor based in Falls Church, Va., said its employees were working with U.S. forces training the Afghan military when the blast occurred.

It was the deadliest attack to rock Kabul in more than two months and followed a series of other assaults on Americans, even as U.S.-led forces are focusing more on training while leaving the fighting militants to their Afghan counterparts.

Thursday's bombing pushed the monthly toll for the U.S.-led coalition to 18, making May the deadliest month so far this year. By comparison, 44 international troops were killed in the same period last year. The overall number of coalition deaths has dropped as Afghan forces increasingly take the lead.

Afghan men clean up after a suicide car bomber attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan.   (Associated Press) Afghan men clean up after a suicide car bomber attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Associated Press)

The suicide bomber detonated his explosives-laden car about 8 a.m. and set nearby buildings on fire. The blast left body parts scattered on the street along with the mangled wreckage of one of the U.S. vehicles.

Kabul Deputy Police Chief Daud Amin said it was difficult to count the dead.

"We saw two dead bodies of children on the ground," Amin said. "But the rest of the bodies were scattered around." Thirty-five Afghans were wounded, according to the Health Ministry.

Kabul had been enjoying a relative lull in attacks in recent weeks. The last major assault was March 9, when suicide bombers struck near the Afghan Defense Ministry while U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel was visiting.

President Hamid Karzai condemned Thursday's attack, saying it was the work of "terrorists and enemies of Afghanistan's peace."

A spokesman for the Hizb-e-Islami militant group, Haroon Zarghoon, told The Associated Press that one of its operatives carried out the attack on two vehicles of U.S. advisers.

Afghan and U.S. soldiers arrive to the scene where a suicide car bomber attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, May 16, 2013. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack, killing many in the explosion and wounding tens, police and hospital officials said. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack. The powerful explosion rattled buildings on the other side of Kabul and sent a pillar of white smoke into the sky in the city's east. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus) (Associated Press) Afghan and U.S. soldiers arrive to the scene where a suicide car bomber attacked a NATO convoy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Thursday, May 16, 2013. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack, killing many in the explosion and wounding tens, police and hospital officials said. A Muslim militant group, Hizb-e-Islami, claimed responsibility for the early morning attack. The powerful explosion rattled buildings on the other side of Kabul and sent a pillar of white smoke into the sky in the city's east. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus) (Associated Press)

Zarghoon says the organization has formed a new cell to stage suicide attacks on U.S. and other coalition troops.

"The cell had been monitoring the movement and timing of the American convoy for a week and implemented the plan Thursday morning," Zarghoon said.

He said the cell was established in response to reports that the U.S. plans to keep permanent bases and troops in Afghanistan even after the NATO withdrawal.

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