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Bomb suspects appear driven by faith

Published: Monday, April 22 2013 8:44 p.m. MDT

In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange Euronext, employees of the NYSE observe a moment of silence on the floor of the exchange in New York, Monday, April 22, 2013, a week after bombs exploded at the finish line of of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/NYSE Euronext, Ben Hider) (Associated Press) In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange Euronext, employees of the NYSE observe a moment of silence on the floor of the exchange in New York, Monday, April 22, 2013, a week after bombs exploded at the finish line of of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/NYSE Euronext, Ben Hider) (Associated Press)

BOSTON — The two brothers suspected of bombing the Boston Marathon appear to have been motivated by their religious faith but do not seem connected to any Muslim terrorist groups, U.S. officials said Monday after interrogating the severely wounded younger man. He was charged with federal crimes that could bring the death penalty.

Seven days after the bombings, Boston was bustling Monday, with runners hitting the pavement, children walking to school and enough cars clogging the streets to make the morning commute feel almost back to normal.

Residents paused in the afternoon to observe a moment of silence at 2:50 p.m., the time of the first blast. Church bells tolled across the city and state in tribute to the victims.

Standing on the steps of the state Capitol, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick bowed his head and said after the moment of silence: "God bless the people of Massachusetts. Boston Strong."

People link hands to form a human chain from a makeshift memorial for fallen MIT police officer Sean Collier to a campus police station at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., Monday, April 22, 2013. A moment of silence for victims of the marathon bombings was also observed during the event. Collier was fatally shot on the MIT campus Thursday, April 18, 2013. Authorities allege that Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were responsible. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) (Associated Press) People link hands to form a human chain from a makeshift memorial for fallen MIT police officer Sean Collier to a campus police station at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., Monday, April 22, 2013. A moment of silence for victims of the marathon bombings was also observed during the event. Collier was fatally shot on the MIT campus Thursday, April 18, 2013. Authorities allege that Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were responsible. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) (Associated Press)

Meanwhile, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was charged in his hospital room with using a weapon of mass destruction to kill. He was accused of joining with his older brother, Tamerlan — now dead — in setting off the pressure-cooker bombs that killed three people and wounded more than 200 a week ago.

The brothers, ethnic Chechens from Russia who had been living in the U.S. for about a decade, practiced Islam.

Two U.S. officials said preliminary evidence from an interrogation suggests the brothers were motivated by religion but were apparently not tied to any Islamic terrorist organizations. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the investigation.

The criminal complaint containing the charges against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev shed no light on the motive.

But it gave a detailed sequence of events and cited surveillance-camera images of him dropping off a knapsack with one of the bombs and using a cellphone, perhaps to coordinate or detonate the blasts.

People pause for a moment of silence near the Statehouse in Boston at 2:50pm, Monday, April 22, 2013, exactly one week after the first bomb went off at the finish area of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) (Associated Press) People pause for a moment of silence near the Statehouse in Boston at 2:50pm, Monday, April 22, 2013, exactly one week after the first bomb went off at the finish area of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) (Associated Press)

The Massachusetts college student was listed in serious but stable condition at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the throat and other injuries. His 26-year-old brother died last week in a fierce gunbattle with police.

"Although our investigation is ongoing, today's charges bring a successful end to a tragic week for the city of Boston and for our country," Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement.

The charges carry the death penalty or a prison sentence of up to life.

"He has what's coming to him," a wounded Kaitlynn Cates said from her hospital room. She was at the finish line when the first blast knocked her off her feet, and she suffered an injury to her lower leg.

In outlining the evidence against him in court papers, the FBI said Tsarnaev was seen on surveillance cameras putting a knapsack down on the ground near the site of the second blast and then manipulating a cellphone and lifting it to his ear.

A priest comforts family members of Boston Marathon bomb victim Krystle Campbell after her funeral at St. Joseph's Church in Medford, Mass. Monday, April 22, 2013. At center is her mother, Patty Campbell, and her brother, Billy. At far right is Boston Cardinal Sean O'Malley. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) (Associated Press) A priest comforts family members of Boston Marathon bomb victim Krystle Campbell after her funeral at St. Joseph's Church in Medford, Mass. Monday, April 22, 2013. At center is her mother, Patty Campbell, and her brother, Billy. At far right is Boston Cardinal Sean O'Malley. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) (Associated Press)

Seconds later, the first explosion went off about a block down the street and spread fear and confusion through the crowd. But Tsarnaev — unlike nearly everyone around him — looked calm and quickly walked away, the FBI said.

Just 10 seconds or so later, the second blast occurred where he had left the knapsack, the FBI said.

The FBI did not make it clear whether authorities believe he used his cellphone to detonate one or both of the bombs or whether he was talking to someone.

The court papers also said that during the long night of crime Thursday and Friday that led to the older brother's death and the younger one's capture, one of the Tsarnaev brothers told a carjacking victim: "Did you hear about the Boston explosion? I did that."

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