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DOMA case could give windfall to gay couples

Supreme Court to rule on federal benefits for them

Published: Tuesday, June 30 2015 1:49 p.m. MDT

In this May 3, 2011 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. (Alex Brandon, Associated Press) In this May 3, 2011 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in Washington. (Alex Brandon, Associated Press)

SAN FRANCISCO — For Mina Meyer and Sharon Raphael, two women in their 70s who fell in love more than four decades ago and have been married for more than four years, the U.S. Supreme Court's pending consideration of a law that prohibits the federal government from recognizing unions like theirs is about more than civil rights. It's about buying a new roof for their California home, replacing their 2005 Toyota Camry and ensuring Meyer doesn't take a financial hit if Raphael dies first.

The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments this month in a challenge to a provision of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, that denies legally married gay and lesbian couples federal benefits available to heterosexual married couples, including tax and Social Security benefits. A decision is not expected until the end of June, but accountants and tax attorneys anticipating the 18-year-old law's demise are already encouraging same-sex couples like Raphael and Meyer to seek prospective tax refunds, back retirement payments and other spousal subsidies they may have been denied.

In this Friday, March 8, 2013 photo, married couple Sharon Raphael, left, and Mina Meyer hold their Social Security papers at their home in Long Beach, Calif.  (Associated Press) In this Friday, March 8, 2013 photo, married couple Sharon Raphael, left, and Mina Meyer hold their Social Security papers at their home in Long Beach, Calif. (Associated Press)

It is unclear how the justices might rule, but the Obama administration and former President Bill Clinton, who signed the act into law, have urged the court to overturn it on grounds that it violates the civil rights of gay Americans. DOMA supporters, including House Republicans led by Speaker John Boehner, argue that Congress — not the court — should decide as public opinion for same-sex marriage grows. Other conservative groups argue that spousal benefits should be reserved only for couples of the opposite sex.

Part of the urgency for couples to act stems from deadlines established under the U.S. tax code, which gives taxpayers three years to file protective claims for income and estate tax refunds. Same-sex couples or surviving spouses who were legally married before or during 2009 would have until April 15 of this year to submit amended returns claiming overpayments on income for that tax year, said Vickie Henry, a senior staff attorney at Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders.

In this Friday, March 8, 2013 photo, Mina Meyer, left, and Sharon Raphael pose for a photo with their Los Angeles County marriage certificate at their home in Long Beach, Calif. (Associated Press) In this Friday, March 8, 2013 photo, Mina Meyer, left, and Sharon Raphael pose for a photo with their Los Angeles County marriage certificate at their home in Long Beach, Calif. (Associated Press)

At the time, gay unions were legal in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa, Vermont and briefly in California. New York and the District of Columbia, which have since legalized same-sex unions, also recognized marriages performed in other states or countries.

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