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Letters: Mummy exhibit is distasteful at best; let them rest in peace

Published: Tuesday, Feb. 19 2013 12:00 a.m. MST

This is the mummy and sarcophagus of an Egyptian Priest named Nes‐pa‐kai-schuti, who played a role in the Egyptian religious hierarchy 2,650 years ago. The sarcophagus is made from sycamore wood and decorated with detailed paintings. Beautiful and extensive hieroglyphics tell us his name, his family heritage and his occupation. The inner coffin illustrates stages of the dead man’s journey into the afterlife. (Photo credit: American Exhibitions, Inc.) (, American Exhibitions, Inc.) This is the mummy and sarcophagus of an Egyptian Priest named Nes‐pa‐kai-schuti, who played a role in the Egyptian religious hierarchy 2,650 years ago. The sarcophagus is made from sycamore wood and decorated with detailed paintings. Beautiful and extensive hieroglyphics tell us his name, his family heritage and his occupation. The inner coffin illustrates stages of the dead man’s journey into the afterlife. (Photo credit: American Exhibitions, Inc.) (, American Exhibitions, Inc.)

I find the idea of gaping at some poor soul's withered remains distasteful at best. I can't help but think that they once constituted someone's grandfather, mother, son or daughter. Calling this voyeurism science doesn't make it any more palatable. Wouldn't it be infinitely more civilized to let them rest in peace?

Michael Abel

Midvale

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