Quantcast

Why teen victims of dating violence can't break the cycle

Published: Thursday, Sept. 3 2015 5:38 a.m. MDT

Feb. 2011, Jessica Colwell, of the Peer Leadership Team at Murray High School, speaks at a press conference held by the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) and Utah Dating Violence Task Force to address the issue of teen abusive dating relationships at Murray High School in Murray. Recent studies have found that abuse in teen relationships are taking a toll on their young adult life too. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News) Feb. 2011, Jessica Colwell, of the Peer Leadership Team at Murray High School, speaks at a press conference held by the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) and Utah Dating Violence Task Force to address the issue of teen abusive dating relationships at Murray High School in Murray. Recent studies have found that abuse in teen relationships are taking a toll on their young adult life too. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

Our take: When teen dating becomes abusive it not only changes their self-esteem but it usually takes a toll on their young adult life too. Teens abused in romantic relationship have increased chances to have similar relationships in their young adult life, according to Bonnie Rochman from Time. In Rochman''s article she analyzes research about violent teen dating:

"For teens, dating is about more than just finding a boyfriend or girlfriend. Its a critical part of adolescent development, but with reports of increased violence occurring within relationships, there is growing concern about how that early experience with dating aggression can impact young adult relationships.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 9.4 percent of teens in a recent survey reported being physically abused by a romantic partner in the past 12 months that included being slapped, hit, or intentionally injured. There is also evidence that adolescents who experience violence in early relationships are more vulnerable to being abused again, and indeed the latest study on the issue published in the journal Pediatrics shows that teens who experienced aggression from a romantic partner between the ages of 12 and 18 were up to three times as likely to be re-victimized in relationships as young adults."

Copyright 2015, Deseret News Publishing Company