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Ed Gogek: Legalizing recreational use marijuana a bad trip for Democrats

Published: Thursday, Nov. 8 2012 3:14 p.m. MST

A medical marijuana plant is shown at the Northwest Patient Resource Center medical marijuana dispensary, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Seattle. After voters weighed in on election day, Colorado and Washington became the first states to allow legal pot for recreational use, but they are likely to face resistance from federal regulations.  (Ted S. Warren, ASSOCIATED PRESS) A medical marijuana plant is shown at the Northwest Patient Resource Center medical marijuana dispensary, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Seattle. After voters weighed in on election day, Colorado and Washington became the first states to allow legal pot for recreational use, but they are likely to face resistance from federal regulations. (Ted S. Warren, ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Our take: Ed Gogek is an addiction psychiatrist and board member of Keep AZ Drug Free notes the effects of legalizing recreational use marijuana in Colorado and Washington State, and the affects it would have on the Democratic party and their policies.

Tuesday’s election was a victory for the marijuana lobby: Colorado and Washington State voted to legalize recreational use, while Massachusetts will now allow doctors to recommend it as medicine.

It’s a movement around which many Democrats have coalesced. In Colorado, legalization was part of the state party’s platform. And last year, in Montana, Republicans voted to overturn the state’s medical marijuana law, but the Democratic governor saved it with a veto.

But Democrats should think twice about becoming the party of pot. I’m a lifelong partisan Democrat, but I’ve also spent 25 years as a doctor treating drug abusers, and I know their games. They’re excellent con artists.

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