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Experts warn about security flaws in airline boarding passes

Published: Monday, Aug. 3 2015 12:36 a.m. MDT

Feb. 2012, Traveler Linda Burch, right, gets some new security information from TSA\'s Jennifer Cowdell while going through security at Salt Lake International Airport in Salt Lake City. Burch is using the pre-screening process which was designed to enhance security, but has recently been found to have flaws. (Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News) Feb. 2012, Traveler Linda Burch, right, gets some new security information from TSA\'s Jennifer Cowdell while going through security at Salt Lake International Airport in Salt Lake City. Burch is using the pre-screening process which was designed to enhance security, but has recently been found to have flaws. (Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News)

Our take: Just before holiday travel season, John Butler, an aviation blogger spread the word of vulnerability in the Transportation Security Administration's pre-screening system. James Ball, from The Washington Post reports on the recent airline security flaws:

"Security flaws in airline boarding passes could allow would-be terrorists or smugglers to know in advance whether they will be subject to certain security measures, and perhaps even permit them to modify the designated measures, security researchers have warned.

The vulnerabilities center on the Transportation Security Administration's pre-screening system, a paid-for program in which the screening process is expedited for travelers at the airport: Laptop computers can remain in hand baggage, as can approved containers of liquid, and belts and shoes can be kept on.

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