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D.C. Third Ward Mormons would welcome Romney, even though most are Democrats

Published: Sunday, Aug. 2 2015 8:41 a.m. MDT

In this Thursday Dec. 22, 2011 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney, visits St. Paul's Lutheran Church while campaigning in Berlin, N.H. Should Mitt Romney win the upcoming election, his future ward in Washington D.C. would be the D.C. Third Ward.  (Associated Press) In this Thursday Dec. 22, 2011 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney, visits St. Paul's Lutheran Church while campaigning in Berlin, N.H. Should Mitt Romney win the upcoming election, his future ward in Washington D.C. would be the D.C. Third Ward. (Associated Press)

Our take: Should Mitt Romney win the upcoming election, his future ward in Washington, D.C., would be the D.C. Third Ward. While the ward is ready to welcome the Romneys, most members of the congregation are Democrats. In this piece from The Washington Post, Michelle Boorstein talks with members of the ward.

If Mitt Romney wins the presidency, one decision about life in Washington would be made for him: his church. Mormonism mandates that followers attend their assigned local congregation, called a “ward,” and folks at the Third Ward on 16th Street NW are already revved up with excitement.

Well, kind of.

They’re mostly Democrats, including the sort of President Obama supporters that Romney was secretly videotaped disparaging in his now-notorious remark about “the 47 percent” of Americans who don’t pay federal taxes.

But the Third Ward congregants don’t seem inclined to hold a grudge.

“I hope he doesn’t end up making that move [to the White House], but if he does, I’d welcome him with open arms,” said Corban Tillemann-Dick, 26, who works phone banks for Obama’s reelection.

In fact, if Romney wins, Tillemann-Dick hopes he might be picked to be the new president’s “home teacher,” a designated person every Mormon has in their congregation as a go-to caregiver.

“If he needed a friend to talk to or a shoulder to cry on — I think it would be a wonderful opportunity,” he said.

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