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Robert P. George: Marriage, religious liberty, and the “grand bargain”

Published: Friday, Sept. 4 2015 10:48 a.m. MDT

To believe a comprise with those arguing for the redefinition of marriage would not bring ill consequences to believers in conjugal marriage, or marriage with the goal of procreation, is a belief not grounded in reality, according to Robert P. George. (Shutterstock.com) To believe a comprise with those arguing for the redefinition of marriage would not bring ill consequences to believers in conjugal marriage, or marriage with the goal of procreation, is a belief not grounded in reality, according to Robert P. George. (Shutterstock.com)

Our take: To believe a comprise with those arguing for the redefinition of marriage would not bring ill consequences to believers in conjugal marriage, or marriage with the goal of procreation, is a belief not grounded in reality, according to Robert P. George. In this essay, he discusses how it is inevitable that the supporters of redefining marriage would turn against those that believe in traditional marriage.

It was only yesterday, was it not, that we were being assured that the redefinition of marriage to include same-sex partnerships would have no impact on persons and institutions that hold to the traditional view of marriage as a conjugal union? Such persons and institutions would simply be untouched by the change. It won’t affect your marriage or your life, we were told, if the law recognizes Henry and Herman or Sally and Sheila as “married.”

Those offering these assurances were also claiming that the redefinition of marriage would have no impact on the public understanding of marriage as a monogamous and sexually exclusive partnership. No one, they insisted, wanted to alter those traditional marital norms. On the contrary, the redefinition of marriage would promote and spread those norms more broadly.

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