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U.S. computer graphics scientist wins Kyoto Prize

Published: Wednesday, July 29 2015 11:55 a.m. MDT

In this undated photo released by the Inamori Foundation, American computer scientist Ivan Sutherland, of Portland State University, is shown. Sutherland, 74, has won Japan's annual Kyoto Prize for his contributions to computer graphics technology and interactive interfaces that allow people to use computers without the need for complicated programming. Sutherland was named the winner Friday, June 22, 2012, in the category of advanced technology. (The Inamori Foundation, Associated Press) In this undated photo released by the Inamori Foundation, American computer scientist Ivan Sutherland, of Portland State University, is shown. Sutherland, 74, has won Japan's annual Kyoto Prize for his contributions to computer graphics technology and interactive interfaces that allow people to use computers without the need for complicated programming. Sutherland was named the winner Friday, June 22, 2012, in the category of advanced technology. (The Inamori Foundation, Associated Press)

TOKYO — An American regarded as the father of computer graphics, an Indian literary critic and a Japanese molecular cell biologist are winners of the annual Kyoto Prize, Japan's highest private award for global achievement.

The Inamori Foundation said Friday that U.S. computer scientist Ivan Sutherland won the advanced technology prize. Sutherland is perhaps best known for developing the Sketchpad in 1963. The graphics interface program that allowed users to manipulate figures on a screen through pointing a device — an innovation that helped people use computers without the need for complicated programming.

Gayatri Chakrovoty, an Indian literary critic and educator whose work focuses on those marginalized by Western culture, including immigrants, the working class and women, won the arts and philosophy prize. A professor at Columbia University, she is known in literary circles for her essay, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" about the economically dispossessed.

In this May 10, 2012 photo released by the Inamori Foundation, Japanese scientist Yoshinori Ohsumi, a molecular biologist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology is shown. Ohsumi, 67, was awarded Japan's annual Kyoto Prize for his work in the basic sciences Friday, June 22, 2012. (The Inamori Foundation, Associated Press) In this May 10, 2012 photo released by the Inamori Foundation, Japanese scientist Yoshinori Ohsumi, a molecular biologist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology is shown. Ohsumi, 67, was awarded Japan's annual Kyoto Prize for his work in the basic sciences Friday, June 22, 2012. (The Inamori Foundation, Associated Press)

Japan's Yoshinori Ohsumi, a molecular biologist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, was awarded the basic sciences prize for his contributions in the significance of autophagy, now regarded as a vital cell-recycling system that may aid in future developments to treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, cancer and other age-related ailments.

The Inamori Foundation is a charitable body established in 1984 by the founder of Japanese electronic component maker Kyocera Corp., Kazuo Inamori.

Each laureate will receive a diploma, a gold Kyoto Prize medal and a cash gift of 50 million yen ($630,000) at a ceremony in Kyoto in November.

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